Vegetable Cookery: Including a Complete Set of Recipes for Pastry, Preserving, Pickling, the Preparation of Sauces, Soups, Beverages, Etc., Etc

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Frederick Pitman, 1866 - Cooking (Vegetables) - 241 pages
 

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Contents

I
1
II
18
III
24
IV
31
V
39
VI
55
VII
62
VIII
68
XIII
128
XIV
130
XV
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XVI
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XVII
173
XVIII
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XX
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XXI
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IX
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XI
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XII
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XXII
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XXIII
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XXV
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XXVI
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Page 199 - An ounce or two of moist sugar, the coarser the better, may be put into a small saucepan with a piece of butter the size of a walnut, and dissolved together ; add a glass of ketchup, and stir it well.
Page 224 - Pick and wash young Parsley, shake it in a dry cloth to drain the water from it ; spread it on a sheet of clean paper, in a Dutch oven before the fire, and turn it frequently until it is quite crisp. — This is a much more easy way of preparing it than Frying it, which is not seldom ill done.
Page 228 - ... best method of preparing the pickle, as cheap as any, and requires less care than any other way. Bruise in a mortar four ounces of the above spices ; put them into a stone jar with a quart of the strongest vinegar, stop the jar closely with a bung, cover that with a bladder soaked with pickle, set it on a trivet by the side of the fire for three days, well shaking it up at least three times in the day ; the pickle should be at least three inches above the pickles. The jar being well closed, and...
Page 15 - ... fork take out the specks from each egg as it is broken, that none may accidentally escape notice. Whisk the yolks until they appear light, and the whites until they are a quite solid froth ; while any liquid remains at the bottom of the bowl they are not sufficiently beaten : when a portion of them, taken up with the whisk, and dropped from it, remains standing in points, they are in the proper state for use, and should be mixed into the cake directly.
Page 11 - Oil to stand for a little the Curd subsides, and the Oil may then be poured off, or it may be strained through Calico or Muslin, into a Bottle, and corked up. When it is to be used it may be gently heated and poured out of the Bottle, or cut out by means of a Knife or Cheese Gouge.
Page 108 - ... may be made of it. It may be cut in thin slices and toasted before the fire or on a gridiron, and eaten instead of bread, either in milk or in any kind of soup or pottage, or with any other kind of food with which bread is commonly eaten; or it may be eaten cold, without any preparation, with a warm sauce made of butter, molasses or sugar, and a little vinegar. In this...
Page 171 - Oatmeal Pudding. — Pour a quart of boiling milk over a pint of the best fine oatmeal ; let it soak all night ; next day beat two eggs, and mix a little salt ; butter a basin that will just hold it : cover it tight with a floured cloth, and boil it an hour and a half. Eat it with cold butter and salt. When cold, slice and toast it, and eat it its oatcake buttered.
Page 110 - Boil some slices of white bread in a pint of milk; when the bread is quite soft remove it from the fire, sweeten with sugar, and add a little powdered ginger ; pour it into a bowl, and gradually stir in the pulp of three or four nicely baked apples.

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