Velocity of Honey: And More Science Of Everyday Life

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Penguin Canada, Oct 5, 2004 - Science - 224 pages
Why doesn't honey flow out in all directions across your toast? What's the science behind the theory of 'six degrees of separation'? How do stones 'skip'? When visiting a new place, why does getting there always seem to take so much longer than returning home? In The Velocity of Honey, bestselling author Jay Ingram muses upon these and many more daily mysteries that puzzle and perplex.

From mosquitoes to the Marvel Universe, baseball to baby-holding, Ingram's topics are diverse. He also makes startling connections. In some pieces, he relates anecdotes from the history of science and demonstrates their relevance to contemporary scientific debates. In others, he explores the science behind many of our proverbial expressions, common sayings such as 'time flies when you're having fun' and 'it's a small world after all.' In still others, he highlights intriguing links between the worlds of art and science.

As in his hugely popular The Science of Everyday Life, Ingram makes the science of our lives accessible and fascinating.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Cheryl_in_CC_NV - LibraryThing

I've read a lot of more serious, meaty popular science books, but I've not often had the joy of learning from them as I did from this. Lots of accessible brief chapters, perfect for a curious ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Cheryl_in_CC_NV - LibraryThing

I've read a lot of more serious, meaty popular science books, but I've not often had the joy of learning from them as I did from this. Lots of accessible brief chapters, perfect for a curious ... Read full review

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About the author (2004)

Jay Ingram has been the host of Discovery Channel Canada’s Daily Planet since it began in 1995. At the time, it was the only hour-long, prime-time daily science show in the world. Prior to joining Discovery, Jay hosted CBC Radio’s national science show, Quirks and Quarks, from 1979 to 1992. During that time he won two ACTRA awards, one for best host, and several Canadian Science Writers’ awards. He wrote and hosted two CBC Radio documentary series and short radio and television science stories for a variety of programs. He was contributing editor to Owl magazine for ten years, and wrote a weekly science column in the Toronto Star for twelve. Jay has also written eleven bestselling books, including The Daily Planet Book of Cool Ideas.

In 2009, Jay was made a member of the Order of Canada for his contributions towards making complex science accessible to the public – and for his leadership of future generations of science journalists. He has received the Sandford Fleming Medal from the Royal Canadian Institute for his efforts to popularize science, the Royal Society’s McNeil Medal for the Public Awareness of Science, and the Michael Smith Award from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council. He is a Distinguished Alumnus of the University of Alberta and has received five honorary doctorates.

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