Verhandelingen en onuitgegeven stukken betreffende de geschiedenis der Nederlanden, Volume 2

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Bij de weduwe J. Allart, 1827 - Netherlands - 486 pages
 

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Page 281 - Some curious and interesting particulars of this rivalry are given by Sir Walter Raleigh, in his Observations concerning the Trade and Commerce of England with the Dutch and other foreign Nations, which he had laid before King James.
Page 294 - Ondersaten wille, sondern de welcke hij egheen Prince en is, om deselve met recht ende redene te regeeren, voor te staen, ende lief te hebben als een Vader...
Page 283 - ... The exceeding great groves of woods are in the east countries, chiefly within the Baltic; but the large piles of wainscot, clapboard, fir, deal, masts, and other timber are in the Low Countries, where none grows, wherewith they serve themselves and other parts, and this kingdom; and they have...
Page 283 - ... serve themselves and other parts, and this kingdom, with those commodities; they have five or six hundred great long ships continually using that trade, and we none in that course. The wool, cloth, lead, tin, and divers other commodities, are in England ; but by means of our wool and cloth going out rough, undressed, and undyed, there is an exceeding manufactory and drapery in the Low Countries, wherewith they serve themselves and other nations, and advance greatly the employment of their people...
Page 284 - Towns exceeds in shipping all Christendom. We have all things of our own in superabundance to increase traffick, and timber to build ships, and commodities of our own to lade about one thousand ships and vessels at one time, (besides the great fishing,) and as fast as they have made their voyages might relade again, and so year after year all the year long to continue ; yet our ships and mariners decline, and traffick and merchants daily decay. The...
Page 283 - only , beside what they send to other Places ; « and we not one ship in that way.
Page 294 - Prince en is, om deselve met recht ende redenen te regeeren, voor te staen ende lief te hebben als een Vader syne Kinderen, ende een Herder syne Schapen, die syn lyff ende leven settet om deselve te bewaren.
Page 282 - Over and above these, there is a great quantity of fish vended to the Straits. Surely the stream is necessary to be turned to the good of this kingdom, to whose sea-coasts alone God has sent these great blessings, and immense riches for us to take ; and that any Nation should carry away out of this kingdom yearly great masses of money for fish taken in our seas, and sold again by them to us, must needs be a great dishonour to our nation...
Page 283 - ... Holland; they have 500 or 600 large ships employed in exporting it to England and other parts: we not one. The Dutch even interfere with our own. commodities; for our wool and woollen cloth, which goes out rough, undressed, and undyed, they manufacture and serve themselves and other nations with it. We send into the east countries yearly but 100 ships, and our trade chiefly depends upon three towns, Elbing, Koningsberg, andDantzic; but the Low Countries send thither about 3,000 ships: they send...
Page 210 - Châtillon 1; et moi particulièrement, l'en ai tant reçu, que j'estime à bonheur quand je me puis employer pour le servir en quelque sorte. Sa fille, votre...

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