Verses on Various Occasions

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Burns, Oates, 1883 - Christian poetry, English - 340 pages
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Page 348 - Praise to the Holiest in the height, And in the depth be praise : In all His words most wonderful ; Most sure in all His ways.
Page 88 - Oh that I had in the wilderness a lodging place of wayfaring men ; that I might leave my people, and go from them ! for they be all adulterers, an assembly of treacherous men.
Page 150 - LEAD, Kindly Light, amid the encircling gloom, Lead Thou me on! The night is dark, and I am far from home! Lead Thou me on. Keep Thou my feet; I do not ask to see The distant scene — one Step enough for me.
Page 150 - Light, amid the encircling gloom, ••— ' Lead Thou me on ! The night is dark, and I am far from home — Lead Thou me on ! Keep Thou my feet ; I do not ask to see The distant scene, — one step enough for me.
Page 364 - Farewell, but not for ever! brother dear, Be brave and patient on thy bed of sorrow; Swiftly shall pass thy night of trial here, And I will come and wake thee on the morrow.
Page 90 - Him God raised up the third day, and showed him openly; not to all the people, but unto witnesses chosen before of God, even to us, who did eat and drink with him after he rose from the dead.
Page 36 - WEEP not for me; — Be blithe as wont, nor tinge with gloom The stream of love that circles home, Light hearts and free! Joy in the gifts Heaven's bounty lends; Nor miss my face, dear friends! I still am near; — Watching the smiles I prized on earth, Your converse mild, your blameless mirth; Now too I hear Of whispered sounds the tale complete, Low prayers, and musings sweet.
Page 20 - Felix qui potuit rerum cognoscere causas, Atque metus omnes, et inexorabile fatum Subjecit pedibus, strepitumque Acherontis avari.
Page 151 - O'er moor and fen, o'er crag and torrent, till The night is gone ; And with the morn those angel faces smile Which I have loved long since, and lost awhile ! JOHN HENRY NEWMAN.

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