Very Little-- Almost Nothing: Death, Philosophy, Literature

Front Cover

Very Little ... Almost Nothing puts the question of the meaning of life back at the centre of intellectual debate. Its central concern is how we can find a meaning to human finitude without recourse to anything that transcends that finitude. A profound but secular meditation on the theme of death, Critchley traces the idea of nihilism through Blanchot, Levinas, Jena Romanticism and Cavell, culminating in a reading of Beckett, in many ways the hero of the book.
In this second edition, Simon Critchley has added a revealing and extended new preface, and a new chapter on Wallace Stevens which reflects on the idea of poetry as philosophy.

 

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Contents

III
1
IV
2
V
4
VI
8
VII
11
VIII
15
IX
18
X
21
XXIX
123
XXX
125
XXXI
131
XXXII
135
XXXIII
138
XXXV
141
XXXVI
147
XXXVII
154

XI
29
XII
35
XIII
40
XIV
48
XV
52
XVI
56
XVII
57
XVIII
63
XIX
71
XX
77
XXI
85
XXII
89
XXIII
99
XXIV
102
XXV
105
XXVI
110
XXVII
113
XXVIII
114
XXXVIII
155
XXXIX
157
XL
161
XLI
165
XLIII
169
XLIV
172
XLV
181
XLVI
184
XLVII
188
XLVIII
195
XLIX
202
L
207
LI
215
LII
237
LIII
270
LIV
272
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Simon Critchley is Professor of Philosophy in the Graduate Faculty, New School University, New York and at the University of Essex. He is author and editor of many books including The Ethics of Deconstruction and On Humour
(also published by Routledge).

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