Via crucis: a romance of the Second Crusade

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Copp, Clark, 1899 - Fiction - 396 pages
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User Review  - wirkman - LibraryThing

This is one of those books of F. Marion Crawford that I've not yet read, but I must notice the typographical nonsense on the title page: yes, the novels of this author are said to number 25, but, a ... Read full review

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Page 14 - ... rich dark waves. There was something almost irritating in their unnatural smoothness, in the perfect transparency of the man's healthy olive complexion, in the mouselike sleekness of his long arching eyebrows, and in the perfect self-satisfaction and confidence of his rather insolent reddish-brown eyes. His straight, round throat, well proportioned, well set upon his shoulders, and transparently smooth as his own forehead, was thrown into relief by the exquisite gold embroidery that edged the...
Page 11 - He went in, in response to her invitation, and found that she desired to ask his advice as to the best and easiest method of converting Ike into a Union Leaguer. Hotchkiss gave her such advice as he could in the most matter-of-fact way, and went on about his business. Otherwise he paid no more attention to her than if she had been a sign in front of a cigar-store.
Page 15 - The straight cross-hilted sword stood leaning against the wall near the great chimney-piece, but the dagger was still at the belt, a marvel of workmanship, a wonder of temper, a triumph of Eastern art, when almost all art was Eastern. The hilt of solid gold, eight-sided and notched, was cross-chiselled in a delicate but deep design, picked out with rough gems, set with cunning irregularity ; the guard, a hollowed disk of steel, graven and inlaid in gold with Kufic characters; the blade, as long as...
Page 116 - Gilbert answered him by talking of men who had the strength to take the world and to be its masters and make it obey whatsoever laws they saw fit to impose.
Page 211 - There they pitched their camp by the Lake of Ascania, and waited for news of the Germans ; for the messengers had brought information that the German emperor desired to make Nicaea the trysting-place. But the messengers had all been Greeks, and the French waited many days in vain, spoiling the country of all they could take, though it was in the dominion of Christians, and no man dared raise, a hand to defend his own against the crusaders. Among the French there were many, both of the great lords...
Page 14 - ... ways, with equal chances, the one seemed to squander where the other turned everything to his own advantage. Standing, Sir Arnold was scarcely of medium height, but seated, he was not noticeably small ; and, like many men of short stature, he bestowed a constant and thoughtful care upon his person and appearance, which resulted in a sort of permanent compensation. His dark beard was cut to a point, and so carefully trimmed as to remind one of those smoothly clipped trees representing peacocks...
Page 221 - ... turned their eyes toward the rising ground to southward. There were strange figures upon the low hillocks, riding out of the woods at furious speed toward the meadow, and already the deep lines began to open and part to make way for the rush. There were men bareheaded, with rags of mantles streaming in the wind, spurring lame and jaded horses to the speed of a charge, and crying out strange words in tones of terror. But only one word was understood by some of those who heard: "The Seljuks! The...
Page 14 - Byzantine artist, each plate representing in rich colours a little scene from the life and passion of Christ. The straight cross-hilted sword stood leaning against the wall near the great chimneypiece, but the dagger was still at the belt, a marvel of workmanship, a wonder of temper, a triumph of Eastern art, when almost all art was Eastern. The hilt of solid gold, eight-sided and notched, was crosschiselled in a delicate but deep design, picked out with rough gems, set...
Page 136 - But when Bernard had ascended the white wooden stage and stood near the king and the queen, then the hushed stillness became a dead silence, and the eyes of all that multitude were fastened upon his face and form, and each could see him. For a moment every man held his breath, as if an angel had come down from heaven, bringing on his lips the word of God and in his look the evidence of eternal light. He was the holy man of the world even while he lived, and neither before him nor after him, since...
Page 235 - ... blown from the gale. At the same instant the great Hungarian horse was upon her, tried to leap her in his stride, struck her empty saddle with his broad chest, and fell against her and upon her with all his enormous weight, and the two rolled over each other, frantically kicking. The standardbearer's horse, less mad than the others and some lengths behind, checked himself cleverly, and after two or three short, violent strides, thatalmostunseated his rider, planted his fore feet in the turf and...

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