Viator: Or, A Peep Into My Note Book

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Plaskitt & Cugle, 1841 - 355 pages
 

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Page 169 - Thou art the garden of the world, the home Of all Art yields, and Nature can decree ; Even in thy desert, what is like to thee ? Thy very weeds are beautiful, thy waste More rich than other climes' fertility ; Thy wreck a glory, and thy ruin graced With an immaculate charm which cannot be defaced.
Page 176 - But man is a noble animal, splendid in ashes and pompous in the grave, solemnizing nativities and deaths with equal lustre, nor omitting ceremonies of bravery in the infamy of his nature.
Page 257 - Eternal Maker has ordain'd The powers of man; we feel within ourselves His energy divine; he tells the heart, He meant, he made us to behold and love What he beholds and loves, the general orb Of life and being; to be great like him, Beneficent and active. Thus the men Whom Nature's works can charm, with God himself Hold converse; grow familiar, day by day, With his conceptions, act upon his plan; And form to his, the relish of their souls.
Page 146 - there is more joy in heaven over one sinner that repenteth, than over ninety and nine just persons that need no repentance.
Page 269 - True, I talk of dreams, Which are the children of an idle brain, Begot of nothing but vain fantasy...
Page 275 - Our life is two-fold : Sleep hath its own world, A boundary between the things misnamed Death and existence : Sleep hath its own world, And a wide realm of wild reality. And dreams in their development have breath, And tears, and tortures, and the touch of joy...
Page 65 - ... it were better for a man to be subject to any vice than to it; for all other vanities and sins are recovered, but a drunkard will never shake off the delight of beastliness ; for the longer it possesseth a man the more he will delight in it ; and the older he groweth the more he shall be subject to it; for it dulleth the spirits, and destroyeth the body, as ivy doth the old tree, or as the worm that engendereth in the kernel of the nut.
Page 174 - Duncan is in his grave; After life's fitful fever he sleeps well; Treason has done his worst: nor steel, nor poison, Malice domestic, foreign levy, nothing Can touch him further.
Page 257 - To some she taught the fabric of the sphere, The changeful Moon, the circuit of the stars, The golden zones of Heaven ; to some she gave To weigh the moment of eternal things, Of time, and space, and Fate's unbroken chain, And will's quick impulse : others by the hand She led o'er vales and mountains, to explore What healing virtue swells the tender veins Of herbs and flowers ; or what the beams of morn Draw forth, distilling from the clifted rind In balmy tears.
Page 65 - TAKE especial care that thou delight not in wine ; for there never was any man that came to honour or preferment that loved it ; for it transformed! a man into a beast, decayeth health, poisoneth the breath, destroyeth natural heat, brings a man's stomach to an artificial heat, deformeth the face, rotteth the teeth, and, to conclude, maketh a man contemptible, soon old, and despised of all wise and worthy men...

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