Vice-presidential Power: Advice and Influence in the White House

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Johns Hopkins University Press, 1984 - Political Science - 278 pages
By analyzing Walter Mondale's role in the Carter Administration, Light addresses the issue of how the modern Vice President has become a significant actor in the White House policy process. Mondale's mastery of the important resources of time, energy, information, expertise and proximity to Carter made him the most influential of all Vice Presidents. Light measures holders of this office from Henry Wallace through George Bush against the Mondale standard and concludes that the ultimate impact of the Vice President is still constrained by the President's willingness to listen. ISBN 0-8018-3058-3 : $19.95.

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Contents

THE VICEPRESIDENTIAL JOB DESCRIPTION
27
THE INSTITUTIONAL VICEPRESIDENCY
63
PRESIDENTS VICEPRESIDENTS AND STAFFs
101
Copyright

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