Victim of the aurora

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Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1978 - Fiction - 219 pages
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The thrilling story of an ill-fated expedition to the South Pole by the bestselling and award-winning author of Schindler's List. In the waning years of the Edwardian era, a group of English gentleman- adventurers led by Sir Eugene Stewart launched an expedition to reach the South Pole. More than sixty years later, Anthony Piers, the official artist of the New British South Polar Expedition, finally unveils the sobering conditions of their perilous journey: raging wind, bitter cold, fierce hunger, absolute darkness-and murder. The first two decades of the twentieth century were known as the "heroic era" of Antarctic exploration. In 1911, Roald Amundsen reached the South Pole. Weeks later, doomed British explorer Robert Falcon Scott arrived-and then perished in a blizzard. And in 1914, Ernest Shackleton embarked on his infamous voyage to Antarctica. Set during this epic period of adventure and discovery, Victim of the Aurora re-creates a thrilling time in an unforgiving place and is a brilliantly plotted tale of psychological suspense.

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Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
52
Section 3
82
Copyright

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About the author (1978)

Born in Sydney, Australia, in 1935, Thomas Keneally was educated at various schools on the New South Wales north coast. Although he initially studied for the Catholic priesthood, he abandoned that idea in 1960, turning to teaching and clerical work before writing and publishing his first novel, The Place at Whitton, in 1964. Since that time Keneally has been a full-time writer, aside from the occasional stint as a lecturer or writer-in-residence. Considered one of the most successful modern Australian writers of all time, Keneally wrote more than a dozen novels before publishing the story that became his most controversial, but best-known and most influential, to date. Published in 1982, Schindler's Ark, the story of a man, Oskar Schindler, who risked his life to protect beleaguered Jews in Nazi-occupied Poland was considered by some to be a work of journalistic reporting. Eleven years later, Stephen Spielberg adapted Keneally's book into the hugely successful, yet visibly disturbing, film, Schindler's List. Other books written by Keneally include Gossip from the Forest, A Dutiful Daughter, A River Town, and By the Line. Keneally has also written a children's book and a screenplay. In 1983, Thomas Keneally was awarded the order of Australia for his services to Australian Literature. He has won international acclaim for his novels, including Schindler's List, the basis for the Steven Spielberg film and winner of the Booker Prize, and The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith.