Victorian Culture and Classical Antiquity: Art, Opera, Fiction, and the Proclamation of Modernity

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Princeton University Press, Jul 18, 2011 - History - 360 pages
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How did the Victorians engage with the ancient world? Victorian Culture and Classical Antiquity is a brilliant exploration of how the ancient worlds of Greece and Rome influenced Victorian culture. Through Victorian art, opera, and novels, Simon Goldhill examines how sexuality and desire, the politics of culture, and the role of religion in society were considered and debated through the Victorian obsession with antiquity.

Looking at Victorian art, Goldhill demonstrates how desire and sexuality, particularly anxieties about male desire, were represented and communicated through classical imagery. Probing into operas of the period, Goldhill addresses ideas of citizenship, nationalism, and cultural politics. And through fiction--specifically nineteenth-century novels about the Roman Empire--he discusses religion and the fierce battles over the church as Christianity began to lose dominance over the progressive stance of Victorian science and investigation. Rediscovering some great forgotten works and reframing some more familiar ones, the book offers extraordinary insights into how the Victorian sense of antiquity and our sense of the Victorians came into being.

With a wide range of examples and stories, Victorian Culture and Classical Antiquity demonstrates how interest in the classical past shaped nineteenth-century self-expression, giving antiquity a unique place in Victorian culture.

 

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Contents

Classics in Victorian Culture
1
PART 1 ART AND DESIRE
21
PART 2 MUSIC AND CULTURAL POLITICS
85
VICTORIAN NOVELS OF ANCIENT ROME
151
CODA
265
Notes
273
Bibliography
313
Index
341
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About the author (2011)

Simon Goldhill is professor of Greek literature and culture and fellow and director of Studies in Classics at King's College, University of Cambridge. His many books include "Love, Sex, and Tragedy: How the Ancient World Shapes Our Lives".

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