Victorian Lincoln

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, 1974 - History - 341 pages
Drawing from a wide range of local sources, Sir Francis describes Lincoln as it underwent major change: with the advent of the railways, this ancient cathedral city, hitherto predominantly a market centre, became an industrial city. Sir Francis discusses all aspects of life in the Victorian city, political and municipal reform, the continuing influence of the gentry, the growth of non-confomity and the recovery of Anglicanism, the awakening of the cathedral to new life, and population growth with its attendant social problems - housing, public health and education. Throughout, the author's personal knowledge of the city enables him to give the feel of the period in a fascinating and vivid way. This volume will be of great interest to specialists in nineteenth-century history, and, like the others in the series, to local historians and people who care for the city.
 

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Contents

Politics 183268
14
I
126
Problems of public health
156
1
172
Industry and agriculture 18701914
201
Reluctant progress
220
The minster
256
The schools after 1870
273
II
290
Population
306
a legend
317
Index
323
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