Villette

Front Cover
Smith, Elder & Company, 1873 - 478 pages
52 Reviews
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - wealhtheowwylfing - LibraryThing

"I seemed to hold two lives--the life of thought, and that of reality; and, provided the former was nourished with a sufficiency of the strange necromantic joys of fancy, the privileges of the latter ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - baswood - LibraryThing

[Villette] by Charlotte Bronte It is hard to believe that Villette was published in 1853 and yet its style is so very reminiscent of its era. It reads like a Victorian novel but one with hardly any ... Read full review

Contents

I
v
III
7
IV
14
V
29
VII
37
VIII
41
IX
52
X
61
XXVII
233
XXVIII
242
XXX
255
XXXII
268
XXXIII
281
XXXIV
295
XXXVI
310
XXXVII
322

XII
75
XIII
85
XV
92
XVI
98
XVII
108
XVIII
118
XIX
145
XX
156
XXI
170
XXIII
179
XXIV
186
XXV
197
XXVI
217
XXXVIII
335
XXXIX
345
XLI
355
XLII
363
XLIII
371
XLV
382
XLVI
394
XLVII
408
XLVIII
422
L
445
LI
455
LII
462
LIV
475

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Page 120 - And the devil said unto him, All this power will I give thee, and the glory of them : for that is delivered unto me ; and to whomsoever I will I give it. If thou therefore wilt worship me, all shall be thine.
Page 248 - Before calamity she is a tigress ; she rends her woes, shivers them in compulsed abhorrence. Pain, for her, has no result in good ; tears water no harvest of wisdom : on sickness, on death itself, she looks with the eye of a rebel. Wicked, perhaps, she is, but also she is strong : and her strength has conquered Beauty, has overcome Grace, and bound both at her side, captives peerlessly fair, and docile as fair.
Page 306 - ... and resistant. In this matter I was not disposed to gratify Dr. John: not at all. With now welcome force, I realized his entire misapprehension of my character and nature. He wanted always to give me a role not mine. Nature and I opposed him. He did not at all guess what I felt: he did not read my eyes, or face, or gestures; though, I doubt not, all spoke. Leaning towards me coaxingly, he said, softly, "Do content me, Lucy.
Page 74 - ... from desk to desk: then - when I had gravely and tranquilly returned to the estrade, courteously requested silence, and commenced a dictation as if nothing at all had happened - the pens travelled peacefully over the pages, and the remainder of the lesson passed in order and industry. "C'est bien," said Madame Beck, when I came out of class, hot and a little exhausted.
Page 101 - Oh, my childhood ! I had feelings: passive as I lived, little as I spoke, cold as I looked, when I thought of past days, I could feel. About the present, it was better to be stoical ; about the future — such a future as mine — to be dead. And in catalepsy and a dead trance, I studiously held the quick of my nature.
Page 354 - ... something more solid than either night-shadow, or branch-shadow, blackened out of the boles. At last the struggle ceased. What birth succeeded this travail ? What Dryad was born of these throes ? We watched fixedly. A sudden bell rang in the house — the prayerbell. Instantly into our alley there came, out of the berceau, an apparition, all black and white. With a sort of angry rush — close, close past our faces — swept swiftly the very NUN herself!
Page 75 - ... necessary for their occasions, they brought it out with a careless ease and breadth altogether untroubled by the rebuke of conscience. Not a soul in Madame Beck's house, from the scullion to the directress herself, but was above being ashamed of a lie ; they thought nothing of it : to invent might not be precisely a virtue, but it was the most venial of faults. " J'ai menti plusieurs fois," formed an item of every girl's and woman's monthly confession : the priest heard unshocked, and absolved...
Page 151 - Ginevra gradually became with me a sort of heroine. One day, perceiving this growing illusion, I said, " I really believe my nerves are getting overstretched: my mind has suffered somewhat too much; a malady is growing upon it — what shall I do? How shall I keep well? " Indeed there was no way to keep well under the circumstances. At last a day and night of peculiarly agonising depression were succeeded by physical illness — I took perforce to my bed. About this time the Indian summer closed...
Page 435 - Will the dormitoryplanks sustain my tread untraitorous ? Yes. I know wherever a board is loose, and will avoid it. The oak staircase creaks somewhat as I descend, but not much — I am in the carre. The great classe-doors are close shut : they are bolted. On the other hand, the entrance to the corridor stands open. The classes seem to my thought great dreary jails, buried far back beyond thoroughfares, and for me, filled with spectral and intolerable Memories, laid miserable amongst their straw and...
Page 478 - ... monarch in his state; the heavens are one flame; so wild are they, they rival battle at its thickest - so bloody, they shame Victory in her pride. I know some signs of the sky; I have noted them ever since childhood. God watch that sail! Oh! guard it! The wind shifts to the west. Peace, peace, Banshee - "keening

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