Violence in Early Modern Europe 1500-1800

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 4, 2001 - History - 269 pages
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A broad-ranging survey of violence in western Europe from the Reformation to the French Revolution. Julius Ruff summarises a huge body of research and provides readers with a clear, accessible, and engaging introduction to the topic of violence in early modern Europe. His book, enriched with fascinating illustrations, underlines the fact that modern preoccupations with the problem of violence are not unique, and that late medieval and early modern European societies produced levels of violence that may have exceeded those in the most violent modern inner-city neighbourhoods. Julius Ruff examines the role of the emerging state in controlling violence; the roots and forms of the period's widespread interpersonal violence; violence and its impact on women; infanticide; and rioting. This book, in the successful textbook series New Approaches to European History, will be of great value to students of European history, criminal justice sciences, and anthropology. --Publisher description.
 

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Contents

The problem of violence in early modern Europe
1
Representations of violence
11
States arms and armies
44
Justice
73
The discourse of interpersonal violence
117
Ritual group violence
160
Popular protest
184
Organized crime
216
Conclusion
248
Index
254
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About the author (2001)

Julius Ruff is Associate Professor of History at Marquette University. He is the author of Crime, Justice and Public Order in Old Regime France (1984) and co-author of Discovering the Western Past: A Look at the Evidence, 4th edition (2000).

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