Violence on Television: Distribution, Form, Context, and Themes

Front Cover
L. Erlbaum Associates, 2003 - Performing Arts - 307 pages
0 Reviews
Concern about violence on television has been publicly debated for the past 50 years. TV violence has repeatedly been identified as a significant causal agent in relation to the prevalence of crime and violence in society. Critics have accused the medium of presenting excessive quantities of violence, to the point where it is virtually impossible for viewers to avoid it.

This book presents the findings of the largest British study of violence on TV ever undertaken, funded by the broadcasting industry. The study was carried out at the same time as similar industry-sponsored research was being conducted in the United States, and one chapter compares findings from Britain and the U.S.A.

The book concludes that it is misleading to accuse all broadcasters of presenting excessive quantities of violence in their schedules. This does not deny that problematic portrayals were found. But the most gory, horrific and graphic scenes of violence were generally contained within broadcasts available on a subscription basis or in programs shown at times when few children were expected to be watching. This factual analysis proves that broadcasters were meeting their obligations under their national regulatory codes of practice.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2003)

My main research interests include media violence, the impact of broadcast news, effects of television on public opinion, the effects of advertising on young people, the use and impact of new interactive media. I have also conducted research on a wide range of other media, marketing and management issues.My recent research has centred on the use and impact of new media (in particular the Internet and digital interactive television). I am particularly interested in the use of the web as an information source and in the impact of Internet-related behaviour on use of other media, especially television.I have continued to conduct research and to write about the influence of television advertising, among children and adults. Much of this recent work has focused on alcohol advertising and young people s drinking. In addition, with two colleagues in my department, I recently conducted research for the Food Standards Agency on the nature of formula product advertising targeted at young mothers.I have also been involved in research from the British Library with colleagues at University College London on the use of online tools for information search in the context of higher education.

Jackie Harrison is Professor in Law at the University of Essex.

Bibliographic information