The Violent Ward

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HarperCollins Publishers, 1993 - Fiction - 305 pages
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In Violent Ward, Len Deighton, the author of bestselling international thrillers, has created a lively and entertaining new character, Mickey Murphy, a criminal lawyer working in Los Angeles. A subversive and abrasive tightwad whose gripes will make readers cheer, Mickey has a house in Woodland Hills, an office in a seedy downtown neighborhood, a Hollywood-bound ex-wife who always needs money, and clients who would plead the Fifth Amendment if they could count that high. Devious and resourceful, when he finds himself being grilled as a suspect for a brutal murder, he goes into high gear. Mickey seeks the answers from one of his clients who can count very well, self-made millionaire and street-smart entrepreneur Zach Petrovitch, who travels in his private jet accompanied by his tough security chief to make shady deals throughout the world. But Petrovitch's wife, Ingrid, is Mickey's childhood sweetheart, and trouble looms when Mickey finds he is still carrying the torch.

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
29
Section 3
45
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Len (Leonard Cyril) Deighton, the master of the modern spy thriller, was born in London in 1929. He attended the Royal College of Art and served in the Royal Air Force. He married Shirley Thompson in 1960. Deighton has varied work experience. Among other things, he has been an art student, railroad worker, pastry cook, waiter, photographer, and a teacher. Deighton's first of more than a dozen bestsellers, The Ipcress File, appeared in 1962. His spy thrillers are characterized by his careful attention to detail of place, sequence of events, and description of people, providing the reader with the strong sense of actually being there as the story unfolds. His works include two trilogies: the "Game, Set and Match" group--Berlin Game (1984), Mexico Set (1985), and London Match (1986) and the "Hook, Line, and Sinker" group - Spy Hook (1988), Spy Line (1989), and Spy Sinker (1990). Len Deighton also writes television plays and cookbooks.

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