Virtual Storytelling. Using Virtual Reality Technologies for Storytelling: Third International Conference, VS 2005, Strasbourg, France, November 30-December 2, 2005, Proceedings

Front Cover
Gérard Subsol
Springer Science & Business Media, Nov 24, 2005 - Computers - 292 pages
The 1st International Conference on Virtual Storytelling took place on September 27–28, 2001, in Avignon (France) in the prestigious Popes’ Palace. Despite the tragic events of September 11 that led to some last-minute cancellations, nearly 100 people from 14 different countries attended the 4 invited lectures given by international experts, the 13 scientific talks and the 6 scientific demonstrations. Virtual Storytelling 2003 was held on November 20–21, 2003, in Toulouse (France) in the Modern and Contemporary Art Museum “Les Abattoirs.” One hundred people from 17 different countries attended the conference composed of 3 invited lectures, 16 scientific talks and 11 posters/demonstrations. Since autumn 2003, there has been strong collaboration between the two major virtual/digital storytelling conference series in Europe: Virtual Storytelling and TIDSE (Technologies for Interactive Digital Storytelling and Entertainment). Thus the conference chairs of TIDSE and Virtual Storytelling decided to establish a 2 year turnover for both conferences and to join the respective organizers in the committees. For the third edition of Virtual Storytelling, the Organization Committee chose to extend the conference to 3 days so that more research work and applications could be be presented, to renew the Scientific and Application Board, to open the conference to new research or artistic communities, and to call for the submission of full papers and no longer only abstracts so as to make a higher-level selection.
 

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Contents

Virtual Reality Technology and Museum Exhibit
3
A ContextBased Storytelling with a Responsive Multimedia System RMS
12
HumanMachine Interface for Interactive Real ThreeDimensional Imaging
22
Proposing Daily Visual Feedback as an Aide to Reach Personal Goals
32
Producing Music as Performing a Game Using Haptic Feedback
41
Virtual Characters
51
Action Planning for Virtual Human Performances
53
An Emotional Architecture for Virtual Characters
63
Storymodels for Interactive Storytelling and Edutainment Applications
168
MetaData for Interactive Storytelling
172
New Ways of Narrative
176
Embodied Reporting Agents as an Approach to Creating Narratives from Live Virtual Worlds
179
Tackling the Lack of Common Sense Knowledge in Story Generation Systems
189
Imagining Frameworks for Personal Narratives
199
Design Principles for Narrative Games
209
Authoring and Producing Reconfigurable Cinematic Narrative for SitBack Enjoyment
219

Generating Verbal and Nonverbal Utterances for Virtual Characters
73
Scenejo An Interactive Storytelling Platform
77
Drama and Emotion
81
Did It Make You Cry? Creating Dramatic Agency in Immersive Environments
82
Formal Encoding of Drama Ontology
95
Emotional Spectrum Developed by Virtual Storytelling
105
The Control of Agents Expressivity in Interactive Drama
115
Agency and the Emotion Machine
125
Telling Stories Through Cameras Lights and Music
129
Interactive Digital Storytelling
133
Toward Interactive Narrative
135
Managing a Nonlinear Scenario A Narrative Evolution
148
Motif Definition and Classification to Structure Nonlinear Plots and to Control the Narrative Flow in Interactive Dramas
158
Interactivity
223
The Role of Tangibles in Interactive Storytelling
224
Enabling CommunicationsBased Interactive Storytelling Through a Tangible Mapping Approach
229
A Multidimensional Scale Model to Measure the Interactivity of Virtual Storytelling
239
Applications
249
The Rapunsel Project
251
Automatic Conversion from EContent into Virtual Storytelling
260
An Interactive Narrative Environment on the Basis of Digitally Enhanced Paper
270
Aspiration for a New Dawn
280
Designing a Storymap for Gormenghast Explore
284
Author Index
288
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