Virtual War: Kosovo and Beyond

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Chatto & Windus, 2000 - Intervention (Droit international) - 249 pages
2 Reviews
This is a brilliant and indispensable history of the present in which Michael Ignatieff reports on the extraordinary way the war in Kosovo was fought - the dawn of a new type of warfare. In real wars, whole nations are mobilised, soldiers fight and die, victories are won. In virtual war, hostilities may not even be declared, the only combatants may be strike pilots and computer programmers, the watching nation is mobilised only as a television audience and instead of victory there is only an uncertain endgame. Kosovo was a virtual war; fought by pilots at 15, 000 feet, commanded by generals whose only view of the battle was through their pilots' bombing sites, and reported by opposing media with competing versions of collateral damage stories; a war in which Americans and NATO forces did the fighting but only Kosovars and Serbs did the dying.

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Virtual war: Kosovo and beyond

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Timed to coincide with the first anniversary of the 1999 war in Kosovo, these works represent a worthy first draft of history. Freelance correspondent Judah explores the historical context underlying ... Read full review

Review: Virtual War

User Review  - H.Sato - Booklog

The technology put to use in Kosovo are the result of a revolution in military affairs, often referred to simply as the RMA which began in 1970s and whose purpose was to return war in the West to its position as the continuation of politics by other means. Read full review

Contents

Contents
3
Balkan Physics
39
A Dialogue on Intervention
71
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Michael Ignatieff, born in Toronto in 1947. But at the age of 11, Ignatieff was sent to Toronto to attend Upper Canada College as a boarder in 1959. At UCC, Ignatieff was elected a school prefect as Head of Wedd's House, was the captain of the varsity soccer team, and served as editor-in-chief of the school's yearbook. As well, Ignatieff volunteered for the Liberal Party during the 1965 federal election by canvassing the York South riding. He resumed his work for the Liberal Party in 1968, as a national youth organizer and party delegate for the Pierre Elliott Trudeau party leadership campaign. He then went on to continue his education at the University of Toronto and Harvard and Cambridge universities. In 1976, Ignatieff completed his Ph.D in History at Harvard University. He was granted a Cambridge M.A. by incorporation in 1978 on taking up a fellowship at King's College there. Michael Ignatieff has written television programs for the BBC, novels, and works of nonfiction. He has also authored essays and reviews for several publications including The New York Times. From 1990-93, he wrote a weekly column on international affairs for The Observer. His family memoir, The Russian Album, received Canada's Governor General Award in 1988. His second novel, Scar Tissue, was short-listed for the Booker Prize in 1993. Other nonfiction works include A Just Measure of Pain, the Penitentiary in the Industrial Revolution and the Warrior's Honor: Ethic War and the Modern Conscience.

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