Virtual Ethnography

Front Cover
SAGE, Jun 22, 2000 - Computers - 179 pages
3 Reviews

Cutting though the exaggerated and fanciful beliefs about the new possibilities of "net life", Hine produces a distinctive understanding of the significance of the Internet and addresses such questions as: what challenges do the new technologies of communication pose for research methods? Does the Internet force us to rethink traditional categories of "culture" and "society?"

In this compelling and thoughtful book, Hine shows that the Internet is both a site for cultural formations and a cultural artifact which is shaped by people's understandings and expectations.

 

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User Review  - Ludi_Ling - LibraryThing

An excellent review of ethnographic research methods in the social and information sciences. My only gripe is that it is rather out-of-date now, and it focuses on email and IRC as data collecting ... Read full review

Contents

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VI
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VIII
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IX
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XI
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XVIII
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XXX
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XXXI
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Page 1 - Cheat the Prophet." The players listen very carefully and respectfully to all that the clever men have to say about what is to happen in the next generation. The players then wait until all the clever men are dead, and bury them nicely. They then go and do something else. That is all. For a race of simple tastes, however, it is great fun.
Page 1 - The Human Race, to which so many of my readers belong, has been playing at children's games from the beginning, and will probably do it till the end, which is a nuisance for the few people who grow up. And one of the games to which it is most attached is called, 'Keep tomorrow dark', and which is also named (by the rustics in Shropshire I have no doubt) 'Cheat the Prophet'.

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About the author (2000)

Christine Hine is a reader in sociology in the Department of Sociology at the University of Surrey. Her main research centres on the sociology of science and technology with a particular interest in the role played by new technologies in the knowledge production process. She also has a major interest in the development of ethnography in technical settings, and in “virtual methods” (the use of the Internet for social research). In particular, she has developed mobile and connective approaches to ethnography which combine online and offline social contexts. She is the author of Virtual Ethnography (SAGE Publications, 2000), Systematics as Cyberscience (MIT, 2008), Understanding Qualitative Research: The Internet (Oxford, 2012), and Ethnography for the Internet (Bloomsbury, 2015) and the editor of Virtual Methods (Berg, 2005), New Infrastructures for Knowledge Production (Information Science Publishing, 2006), and Virtual Research Methods (SAGE Publications, 2012).

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