Visits and Sketches at Home and Abroad: With Tales and Miscellanies Now First Collected, and a New Edition of the "Diary of an Ennuyee.", Volume 1

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Harper & Brothers, 1834 - Art
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Page 144 - tis fittest. Cor. How does my royal lord? How fares your majesty? Lear. You do me wrong, to take me out o' the grave : — Thou art a soul in bliss ; but I am bound Upon a wheel of fire, that mine own tears Do scald like molten lead.
Page 257 - All things that love the sun are out of doors; The sky rejoices in the morning's birth; The grass is bright with rain-drops; - on the moors The hare is running races in her mirth; And with her feet she from the plashy earth Raises a mist, that, glittering in the sun, Runs with her all the way, wherever she doth run.
Page 44 - And yet on the other hand, unless wariness be used, as good almost kill a man as kill a good book: who kills a man kills a reasonable creature, God's image; but he who destroys a good book kills reason itself, kills the image of God as it were in the eye. Many a man lives a burden to the earth; but a good book is the precious life-blood of a master-spirit, embalmed and treasured up on purpose to a life beyond life.
Page 244 - Though I should gaze for ever On that green light that lingers in the west: I may not hope from outward forms to win The passion and the life, whose fountains are within.
Page 44 - It is true, no age can restore a life, whereof, perhaps, there is no great loss; and revolutions of ages do not oft recover the loss of a rejected truth, for the want of which whole nations fare the worse.
Page 294 - So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call'd, Retain that dear perfection which he owes Without that title : — Romeo, doff thy name ; And for that name, which is no part of thee, 90 Take all myself.
Page 144 - ... stairs rather directed to the use of the guest than to the eye of the artificer; and yet as the one chiefly heeded, so the other not neglected; each place handsome without curiosity, and homely without loathsomeness; not so dainty as not to be trod on, nor yet flubbered up with good fellowship; all more lasting than beautiful, but that the consideration of the exceeding lastingness made the eye believe it was exceeding beautiful.
Page 281 - Mrs. Siddons, in her visit to me, behaved with great modesty and propriety, and left nothing behind her to be censured or despised. Neither praise nor money, the two powerful corrupters of mankind, seem to have depraved her.
Page 260 - I remember formerly being often diverted with this kind of seers ; they come, ask what such a room is called, in which sir Robert lay, write it down, admire a lobster or a cabbage in a marketpiece, dispute whether the last room was green or purple, and then hurry to the inn for fear the fish should be over-dressed.
Page 293 - My only love sprung from my only hate! Too early seen unknown, and known too late ! Prodigious birth of love it is to me, That I must love a loathed enemy.

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