Vocational and Professional Capability: An Epistemological and Ontological Study of Occupational Expertise

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A&C Black, Dec 22, 2009 - Education - 206 pages
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The central claim of this fascinating monograph is that strategies for vocational and professional education adopted by the UK over the last two decades are founded upon a number of fundamental and fatal errors.  The essential problem is that these strategies derive from a number of philosophical confusions about what it is to be skilled, competent or capable. The aim of the book is to unravel the philosophical assumptions at the heart of current strategies, examine their shortcomings and propose a more coherent account of vocational and professional capability.  It will be argued that not only does this have serious practical implications for the vocational curriculum, teaching, learning and assessment, but that it indicates the need for an urgent and radical reassessment of the relationship between vocational, general and academic education.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 The Orthodox Conception of the Vocational
11
2 Philosophical Foundations of the Orthodoxy
25
3 Knowing How and Knowing That
39
4 The Competence Problem
61
5 Towards an Ontology of Occupational Capability
76
6 An Alternative Conception of Vocational and Professional Capability
92
7 Working to Rules
117
8 Constitutive Rules and the Problem of Structure
140
9 The Trouble with CompetenceBased Education and Training
160
10 Rethinking Vocational and Professional Education
175
References
191
Index
203
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About the author (2009)

Gerard Lum is Lecturer in Philosophy and Education Management at King's College, London, UK. He is a longstanding member of the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain.

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