Voices in the Sky: Radio Debates

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IDEA, 2005 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 178 pages
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This book offers readers a one-stop guide to debating on the radio, the benefits of using the format and the procedures necessary to conduct successful debates.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
RADIO DEBATE
9
Radio as a Medium for Debating
11
Acceptance of Radio
12
Channel Characteristics of Radio
13
Implications of Radio Characteristics
14
Country Case Studies
15
Rwanda
16
Distribution of Radio Debate Programs
75
Program Distribution to Other Stations
76
School Distribution
77
Internet Broadcast
78
A DEBATE PRIMER
79
Introduction
81
Introduction to Debate
83
What Is Debate?
84

Points to Remember
17
Topics for Debates
19
Topic Formulation and Wording
20
Topics should be debatable
21
Topics should be simple and straightforward
22
Topics should not be too broad
23
Value topics
24
Policy topics
25
Topic Limits and Boundaries
26
Points to Remember
27
Recruiting and Preparing Debaters
29
Selecting radio debaters
30
Recruiting radio debaters
31
Developing a Core Group of Radio Debaters
32
Training and Preparing Debaters
33
Training for radio debaters
34
Training topic area experts and politicians
36
Rights and clearances
37
Points to Remember
38
Formats for Radio Debating
39
Adjusting Classic Debate Formats for Radio
40
Short Radio Debate Formats
41
Twentyminute oneonone debate with crossexamination commentary or questions
42
Intermediate Radio Debate Formats
44
Thirtyminute twoontwo debate with audience involvement or crossexamination
45
Long Debate Formats
47
Sixtyminute twoontwo debate with crossexamination or audience questions and commentary
49
Other Radio Debate Formats
51
Multisided debate
55
Points to Remember
57
Production of Radio Debates
59
Live audience for radio debates
60
Timing structure
61
Production concerns
62
Live Radio Debates
63
Onsite Production
64
Publicity for Radio Debates
65
Points to Remember
66
Audience Involvement in Radio Debates
67
Audience as judges and critics
68
Audience ballots
69
Announcement of Voting
70
Audience Speeches
71
Points to Remember
72
Formal Debate Procedures
85
The topic
86
Judges
88
Speaking Techniques
89
Becoming a Dynamic Public Speaker
90
Applying Dynamism Factors to Your Speaking Abilities
91
The Power of an Effective Voice
92
Developing a pleasing voice
93
Enthusiastic desire to obtain a response avoid artificialities
95
Making an Argument
99
Types of Argument
102
Deduction
105
Causation
114
Preparing and Gathering Information
121
Importance of Your Own Knowledge and Thinking
122
Exchanging Opinions and Knowledge with Others
123
Observation
124
Using the Library
125
Sources for main and subordinate arguments
126
Sources of factual data
127
Using the Internet
128
Building a Case
131
Types of Topics
132
Value Topics
133
Policy Topics
134
Preparing a Case
135
Attacking a Case
139
Attack the Affirmative Case
140
Strategic willingness to concede portions of case
141
Techniques for dealing with common claims
143
Attack the affirmative plan
147
Attack the Topic Itself
148
Disadvantage argument
149
Types of disadvantages
150
Counterplan argument
151
Critique argument
152
Types of critiques
153
CrossExamination and Questions
157
Guidelines for Asking Questions
158
Guidelines for Answering Questions
159
Glossary
161
Code of the Debater
175
Bibliography
177
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Alfred C. Snider is Edward W. Lawrence Professor of Forensics at the University of Vermont.

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