Voter Turnout and the Dynamics of Electoral Competition in Established Democracies Since 1945

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 19, 2004 - Political Science - 277 pages
Demonstrating how voter turnout can serve as an indicator of the health of a democracy, this study documents the conditions that can result in low voter turnout and suggests reforms that might alleviate these conditions. Mark Franklin concludes that declining turnout does not necessarily reflect reductions in civic virtue or increases in alienation. Franklin claims that turnout falls due to cumulating effects of institutional changes, a lack of competition in elections and a decision by a large proportion of the electorate not to participate as a response to the lack of competition.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Confronting the Puzzles of Voter Turnout
9
A New Approach to the Calculus of Voting
37
The Role of Generational Replacement in Turnout Change
59
Rational Responses to Electoral Competition
91
Explaining Turnout Change in TwentyTwo Countries
119
The Character of Elections and the Individual Citizen
151
Understanding Turnout Decline
171
The Turnout Puzzles Revisited
201
The Surveys Employed in This Book
225
Aggregate Data for Established Democracies 19451999
231
Supplementary Findings
237
Bibliography
251
Author Index
263
Subject Index
267
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