Voyages round the world, from the death of captain Cook to the present time

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Side 130 - for twenty-three weeks we had been treated with the utmost affection and regard, and which seemed to increase in proportion to our stay. That we were not insensible to their kindness, the events which followed more than sufficiently prove ; for to the friendly and endearing behaviour of these people, may be ascribed the motives for that •event which effected the ruin of an expedition, that there was every reason to hope would have been completed in the most fortunate manner.
Side 439 - ... they after a short time succeeded in loosing the sail. Amidst the roar of the wind and sea it was difficult both to hear and to execute the orders that were given, so that it was three-quarters of an hour before we could get the yards braced...
Side 141 - An indifferent spectator would have been at a loss which most to admire — the eyes of famine sparkling at immediate relief, or the horror of their preservers at the sight of so many spectres, whose ghastly countenances, if the cause had been unknown, would rather have excited terror than pity.
Side 83 - Majesty's officer, who will deliver this letter, shall immediately be put in possession of the buildings and districts, or parcels of land, which were occupied by the subjects of that sovereign in April 1789, as well in the port of Nootka, or of Saint Lawrence, as in the other, said to be called Port Cox, and to be situated about sixteen leagues distant from the former to the southward ; and that such parcels or districts of land, of which the English subjects were dispossessed...
Side 135 - Particular people were called on to go into the boat, and were hurried over the side, whence I concluded that with these people I was to be set adrift. I therefore made another effort to bring about a change, but with no other effect than to be threatened with having my brains blown...
Side 135 - I was hauled out of bed, and forced on deck in my shirt, suffering great pain from the tightness with which they had tied my hands. I demanded the reason of such violence, but received no other answer than abuse, for not holding my tongue.
Side 439 - The water and the sky were both as blue, or rather more intensely blue, than I have ever seen them in the tropics, and all the coast was one mass of dazzlingly beautiful peaks of snow, which, when the sun approached the horizon, reflected the most brilliant tints of golden yellow and scarlet ; and then, to see the dark cloud of smoke, tinged with flame, rising from the volcano in a...
Side 439 - ... was the order given, than the daring spirit of the British seaman manifested itself — the men ran up the rigging with as much alacrity as on any ordinary occasion; and although more than once driven off the yard, they after a short time succeeded in loosing the sail. Amidst the roar of the wind and sea it was difficult both to hear and to execute the orders that were given, so that it was...
Side 167 - Upon searching round, he saw an object lying on a rock a dozen yards from the shore, at which he was somewhat frightened. The face and shoulders appeared of human form, and of a reddish colour ; over the shoulders hung long green hair ; the tail resembled that of the seal, but the extremities of the arms he could not see distinctly. The creature continued to make a musical noise while he gazed about two minutes, and on perceiving him it disappeared in an instant.
Side 439 - The heavy rolling of the vessel, and the probability of the masts giving way each time the lower yard-arms struck against the cliffs, which were towering high above our mast-heads, rendered it a service of extreme danger to loose the mainsail; but no sooner was the order given than the daring spirit of the British seaman manifested itself. The men ran up the rigging...

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