WAVERLEY NOVELS

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Page 82 - Full little knowest thou, that hast not tried, What hell it is in suing long to bide: To lose good days, that might be better spent; To waste long nights in pensive discontent; To speed to-day, to be put back to-morrow; To feed on hope, to pine with fear and sorrow; To have thy prince's grace, yet want her peers...
Page 522 - Here lies our sovereign lord the King, Whose word no man relies on ; Who never said a foolish thing, And never did a wise one.
Page 116 - Ah Ben ! Say how or .when Shall we, thy guests, Meet at those lyric feasts, Made at the Sun, The Dog, the Triple Tun ; Where we such clusters had, As made us nobly wild, not mad? And yet each verse of thine Out-did the meat, out-did the frolic wine.
Page 678 - There's such divinity doth hedge a king, That treason can but peep to what it would, Acts little of his will.
Page 82 - To have thy asking, yet wait many years ; To fret thy soul with crosses and with cares ; To eat thy heart through comfortless despairs ; To fawn, to crouch, to wait, to ride, to run ; To spend, to give, to want, to be undone.
Page 15 - When I light on such a character as Bailie Jarvie, or Dalgetty, my imagination brightens, and my conception becomes clearer at every step which I take in his company, although it leads me many a weary mile away from the regular road, and forces me to leap hedge and ditch to get back into the route again.
Page 277 - We are not worst at once — the course of evil Begins so slowly, and from such slight source, An infant's hand might stem its breach with clay ; But let the stream get deeper, and philosophy — Ay, and religion too, — shall strive in vain To turn the headlong torrent.
Page 325 - The great fief of Castleton, with its adjacent wastes and forests, and all the wonders which they contain, had been forfeited in King John's stormy days by one William Peveril, and had been granted anew to the Lord Ferrers of that day. Yet this William's descendants, though no longer possessed of what they alleged to have been their original property, were long distinguished by the proud title of Peverils of the Peak, which served to mark their high descent and lofty pretensions.
Page 8 - The great ladies do go well masqued ; and indeed, it be the only show of their modesty to conceal their countenance ; but alack, they meet with such countenance to uphold their strange doings, that I marvel not at aught that happens.
Page 82 - What hell it is, in sueing long to bide : To lose good days that might be better spent ; To waste long nights in pensive discontent ; To speed to-day, to be put back to-morrow ; To feed on hope, to pine...

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