Wab-ah-see, a Legend of the Sleeping Dew: And Other Poems

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Page 62 - Their pleasant hunting.grounds were sold ; And when the dark night-shadows came. With many a torch-light's glaring flame, They bore the big chief to his rest Upon the highland's lifted crest. They placed him sitting on the hill, That he might see the white man till The broad plains, where his fathers sleep, When gone were all his people's feet. They placed him sitting in his grave, Where he could see the gleaming wave ; And watch the white man's big canoe, When faded were the forms he knew. •They...
Page 63 - ... man rued The day their hands in blood were brued— For, ever at the feast of corn Was heard his voice in taunting scorn; And here and there his vengeful soul Led on the hunt for hidden gold; Then in some lone and tangled fell, Would ring his wild, unearthly yell. Each new moon on his grave they laid Tobacco, to appease his shade. But still the chief, who laid him low, Grew nerveless as an unstrung bow; And when the White Swan's drooping head Told Indian that his soul had fled, He went not on...
Page 61 - Where vengeance lured it* baffled" prey, While Wabasis defenseless stood, .And dared the throng, athirst for blood. But, when his voice in death was still, Memories thronged, the heart to thrill; And many feet, with silent tread, Moved slow, in honor of the dead. In regal state the chief was laid. With death-dance to appease his shade.
Page 63 - ... his grave, Where he could see the gleaming wave; And watch the white man's big canoe, When faded were the forms he knew. They placed him by the white man's trail, That he might see the stranger pale; And where his passing feet should be A long rebuke to treachery. They roofed him o'er with little trees; And bade him wait, and watch through these. But wofully the red man rued The day their hands in blood were brued— For, ever at the feast of corn Was heard his voice...
Page 62 - ... the white man till The broad plains, where his fathers sleep, When gone were all his people's feet. They placed him sitting in his grave, Where he could see the gleaming wave ; And watch the white man's big canoe, When faded were the forms he knew. •They placed him by the white man's trail, That he might see the stranger pale ; And where his passing feet should be A long rebuke to treachery. They roofed him o'er with little trees, And bade him wait, and watch through these. But wofully the...

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