Wabi sabi: the Japanese art of impermanence

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Tuttle Pub., 2003 - Architecture - 165 pages
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Wabi sabi, the quintessential Japanese design aesthetic, is quickly gaining popularity around the world, as evidenced by recent articles in Time, The Chicago Tribune and Kyoto Journal. Taken from the Japanese words wabi, which translates to less is more, and sabi, which means attentive melancholy, wabi sabi refers to an awareness of the transient nature of earthly things and a corresponding pleasure in the things that bear the mark of this impermanence. As a design style, wabi sabi helps us to appreciate the simple beauty in imperfection--of a chipped vase or a rainy day, for example.

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Contents

The Development of Wabi Sabi
7
Wabi Sabi in the Art of Zen
15
Wabi Sabi and the Japanese Character 53
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Andrew Juniper provides a fascinating explanation of wabi sabi, taking the reader from the art's fifteenth-century Japanese origins to its modern day practical applications. The book is peppered with photographs and illustrations that demonstrate how wabi sabi can help provide an alternative to the fast paced, mass produced, neon lit world of today. He lives in Sussex, England where he runs the Wabi-Sabi Art Gallery.

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