Wacousta, or, The prophecy: a tale of the Canadas, Volume 2

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T. Cadell, 1832 - Fiction - 371 pages
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Page 29 - Perhaps it was merely a reflection produced by the lamp on the centre pane," rejoined his friend, still keeping his eye riveted on the suspicious point. " Impossible ! but I will examine the window from the spot on which I stood when I first beheld it." Again he quitted his seat, and carelessly crossed the room. As he returned he threw his glance upon the pane, when, to his infinite horror and surprise, the same frightful vision presented itself. " God of heaven !" he exclaimed aloud, and unable...
Page 186 - Saganaw may take breath," she observed, as she seated herself on the fallen tree ; " the sleep of the red skin is sound, and there is no one upon the path but Oucanasta." Anxious as he felt to secure his return to the fort, there was an implied solicitation in the tones of her to whom he owed so much that prevented Captain de Haldimar from offering an objection, which he feared might be construed into slight. For a moment or two the Indian remained with her arms folded, and her head bent over her...
Page 280 - ... fiends, resolved to sell their lives as dearly as possible ; and for some minutes an obstinate contest was maintained : but the vast superiority of the Indian numbers triumphed ; and although the men fought with all the fierceness of despair, forcing their way to the block-houses, their mangled corses strewed the area in every direction. Neither was the horrid butchery confined to these. Women clinging to their husbands for protection, and, in the recklessness of their despair, impeding the efforts...
Page 120 - The great chief of the Ottawas knows that the Saganaw has promised the red skins a feast," returned the governor. "Were he to leave it to his young warriors to provide it, he would not be able to receive the Ottawa like a great chief, and to make peace with him as he could wish." "My father has a great deal of cloth, red, like the blood of a pale face," pursued the Indian, rather in demand than in observation, as he pointed with his finger to the opposite end of the room. "When the Ottawa was here...
Page 34 - God," exclaimed the Canadian with unfeigned astonishment, "I have not see nobody. But what for do you tink so? It is not just. I have given my oat to serve you, and I shall do it." There was candour both in the tone and countenance of the man as he uttered these words, half in reproach, half in justification; and the officers no longer doubted. "You must forgive our suspicions at a moment like the present," soothingly observed the younger; "yet, Francois, your daughter saw and exchanged signals with...
Page 37 - Canadian, throwing his sack upon the sand near the mouth of the lesser river; "my canoe is chain about twenty yards up de bridge. I shall come to you directly." Then cautioning the officers to keep themselves concealed under the bridge, he moved hastily under the arch, and disappeared in the dark shadow which it threw across the rivulet. The extremities of the bridge rested on the banks of the little river in such a manner as to leave a narrow passage along the sands immediately under the declination...
Page 160 - Indian etiquette to enquire, they waited calmly until it should please their new associate to enter on the history of his exploits. In pursuance of an invitation from Ponteac, he now took his seat on the right hand of that chief, and immediately facing the tree, from which Captain de Haldimar, strongly excited both by the reports of the shots that had been fired, and the sight of the bloody tomahawk of the recently arrived Indian, gazed earnestly and anxiously on the swarthy throng. Glancing once...
Page 46 - ... claiming profound attention when he spoke himself, and manifesting his assent or dissent to the apparently expressed opinions of the lesser chiefs merely by a slight movement of the head. " There he is indeed !" exclaimed Captain Erskine, speaking as one who communes with his own thoughts, while he kept his telescope levelled on the form of the last warrior : " looking just as noble as when, three years ago, he opposed himself to the progress of the first English detachment that had ever penetrated...
Page 127 - Conspicuous at the head of these was he who wore the blanket ; a tall warrior, on whom rested the startled eye of every officer and soldier who was so situated as to behold him. His face was painted black as death ; and as he stood under the arch of the gateway, with his white turbaned head towering far above those of his companions, this formidable and mysterious enemy might have been likened to the spirit of darkness presiding over his terrible legions.
Page 167 - There was an activity about the young chief amply commensurate with the greater physical power of his adversary; while the manner in which he wielded his tomahawk, proved him to be any thing but the novice in the use of the formidable weapon the other had represented him. It was with a feeling of disappointment, therefore, which the peculiarity of his own position could not overcome, he saw Ponteac interpose himself between the parties. Presently, however, a subject of deeper and more absorbing interest...

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