Walk the Lines: The London Underground, Overground

Front Cover
Random House, Jul 14, 2011 - Games - 400 pages
2 Reviews

The only way to truly discover a city, they say, is on foot. Taking this to extremes, Mark Mason sets out to walk the entire length of the London Underground - overground - passing every station on the way.

In a story packed with historical trivia, personal musings and eavesdropped conversations, Mark learns how to get the best gossip in the City, where to find a pint at 7am, and why the Bank of England won't let you join the M11 northbound at Junction 5. He has an East End cup of tea with the Krays' official biographer, discovers what cabbies mean by 'on the cotton', and meets the Archers star who was the voice of 'Mind the Gap'.

Over the course of several hundred miles, Mark contemplates London's contradictions as well as its charms. He gains insights into our fascination with maps and sees how walking changes our view of the world. Above all, in this love letter to a complicated friend, he celebrates the sights, sounds and soul of the greatest city on earth.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Elainedav - LibraryThing

This book appealed to me as I have often thought that as a tourist to London, if you use the tube, you lose the sense of how one place connects to another above ground. Much better then to walk above ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Eyejaybee - LibraryThing

Over the last year or so I have taken to walking around London, completing staged routes such as the Capital Ring and London Loop, and have marvelled at the wealth of interesting sight and the variety ... Read full review

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About the author (2011)

Born in the Midlands in 1971, Mark Mason moved to London when he was 20. Over the next 13 years he sold Christmas cards in Harrods, made radio programmes for the BBC and busked outside Eric Clapton gigs at the Royal Albert Hall. He also published three novels, several books of non-fiction, and wrote for publications as diverse as The Spectator and FourFourTwo. He continues to do some of these things, though has now defected to Suffolk, where he lives with his partner and son.

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