Walking: a fine art, as practised by naturalists and explained by original contributions to this volume, and by quotations from the published works of those who love to dally along country lanes

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Edward Fuller Bigelow
S. E. Cassino & son, 1907 - Sports & Recreation - 163 pages
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Page 138 - AFOOT and light-hearted I take to the open road, Healthy, free, the world before me, The long brown path before me leading wherever I choose.
Page 157 - I will buy with you, sell with you, talk with you, walk with you, and so following; but I will not eat with you, drink with you, nor pray with you.
Page 156 - SHE walks in beauty, like the night Of cloudless climes and starry skies ; And all that's best of dark and bright Meet in her aspect and her eyes : Thus mellow'd to that tender light Which heaven to gaudy day denies.
Page 18 - He that saith, I know Him, and keepeth not His Commandments, is a liar, and the truth is not in him. But whoso keepeth His Word, in him verily is the love of God perfected : hereby know we that we are in Him. He that saith he abideth in Him, ought himself also so to walk, even as He walked.
Page 10 - Now there are diversities of gifts, but the same Spirit. And there are differences of administrations, but the same Lord ; and there are diversities of operations, but it is the same God which worketh all in all. But the manifestation of the Spirit is given to every man to profit withal...
Page 141 - I think I could stop here myself and do miracles, I think whatever I shall meet on the road I shall like, and whoever beholds me shall like me, I think whoever I see must be happy.
Page 61 - I have met with but one or two persons in the course of my life who understood the art of Walking, that is, of taking walks — who had a genius, so to speak, for sauntering, which word is beautifully derived 'from idle people who roved about the country, in the Middle Ages, and asked charity, under pretense of going a la Sainte Terre,' to the Holy Land, till the children exclaimed, 'There goes a Sainte-Terrer,
Page 143 - All seems beautiful to me, I can repeat over to men and women You have done such good to me I would do the same to you, I will recruit for myself and you as I go, I will scatter myself among men and women as I go, I will toss a new gladness and roughness among them, Whoever denies me it shall not trouble me, Whoever accepts me he or she shall be blessed and shall bless me.
Page 144 - Now the joys of the road are chiefly these: A crimson touch on the hard-wood trees; A vagrant's morning wide and blue, In early fall, when the wind walks, too; A shadowy highway cool and brown Alluring up and enticing down From rippled water to dappled swamp, From purple glory to scarlet pomp ; The outward eye, the quiet will, And the striding heart from hill to hill; The tempter apple over the fence ; The cobweb bloom on the yellow quince; The palish asters along the wood, — A lyric touch of the...
Page 158 - Of echoing hill or thicket have we heard Celestial voices, to the midnight air, Sole, or responsive...

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