Walking

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Jun 18, 1994 - Religion - 96 pages
A meandering ode to the simple act and accomplished art of taking a walk. Profound and humorous, companionable and curmudeonly, Walking, by America's first nature writer, is your personal and portable guide to the activity that, like no other, awakens the senses and the soul to the "absolute freedom and wildness" of nature.
 

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User Review  - DanielSTJ - www.librarything.com

An absolutely elegant and beautiful piece of writing. Thoreau soars and astounds with his mesmerizing prose that touches on many different themes seamlessly, yet inclusively-- privately. This is not one to be mixed. Recommended. Read full review

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User Review  - Emma_Manolis - LibraryThing

This was my second reading of "Walking" and, this time, I chose to read it in nature. That really made all the difference. I found myself hating it this last fall when I read it in the confines of my ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
16
Section 3
19
Section 4
36
Section 5
43
Section 6
44
Section 7
46
Section 8
48
Section 9
51
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

Henry David Thoreau was born in 1817 in Concord, Massachusetts. He spent time as a school teacher after attending Harvard College but was dismissed for his refusal to administer corporal punishment. In 1845, wanting to write his first book, he moved to Walden Pond and built his cabin on land owned by Ralph Waldo Emerson. It was during his time at Walden that Thoreau was imprisoned briefly for not paying taxes; this experience became the basis for his well-known essay "Civil Disobedience." He died of tuberculosis in 1862 at the age of 44.

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