Walking Ollie

Front Cover
Short Books, Jan 1, 2010 - Fiction - 189 pages
5 Reviews
One winter's afternoon, Stephen Foster walked into a dog re-homing centre with the intention of picking up a retired greyhound. Instead, he acquired an abandoned lurcher pup. Foster's knowledge of dogs was so vague that he had to look up 'lurcher' in key reference work The Giant Book of the Dog, to find out what sort of animal was coming to join the family. His research counted for little: the new arrival did not conform to any known breed standard, or indeed any standard whatsoever that might be considered dog-normal Walking Ollie is a hilarious - and often heartrending - account of one man's attempt to turn a psychotic wild animal into something resembling a domestic pet.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - LadyBlossom - LibraryThing

A beautiful story about a rescued puppy with a few little problems. Heartwarming and funny all the way through, not to mention that Ollie is absolutely beautiful. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - if0x - LibraryThing

his book documents the first couple of years of Stephen Foster's adoption of Ollie, who was a lurcher pup he and his partner picked up from The Dogs Trust. What struck a chord with me, when reading ... Read full review

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About the author (2010)

Born in Lawrenceville, Pennsylvania, Stephen Foster became a well-known American composer of many popular songs that are still sung and enjoyed today. As a child, Foster learned to play the flute. At the age of 18, he published his first song, "Open Thy Lattice, Love." In 1846 Foster moved to Cincinnati to work as an accountant for one of his brothers. During his career, Foster wrote 189 songs, to most of which he wrote both the words and the music. Among his most notable songs are "Old Folks at Home" (or "Swanee Ribber," as it was commonly called), "O Susanna," "My Old Kentucky Home," and "Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair." "Beautiful Dreamer" was the last song he wrote. Foster finished the composition only a few days before his death. Foster's music was greatly influenced by black minstrel shows. The gentleness of many of Foster's songs was not characteristic of his life. He was constantly in need of money, his marriage was most unhappy, and he died penniless in New York's Bellevue Hospital. Foster's fame lives on today. Hundreds of reprints of Foster's songs are available, almost all of which have "improved" arrangements.

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