Wall of Brass

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Warner Books, 1995 - Fiction - 384 pages
2 Reviews
Two cops come upon a man lying facedown on a New York street corner. It is before dawn and snowing. The body is wearing a jogging suit, sneakers, a stocking cap. Rushed to the scene in a squad car, Chief of Detectives Bert P. Farber joins much of the headquarters brass standing over the body. The murdered man is Harry Chapman, the brilliant new police commissioner, an ex-cop turned politician, once Farber's radio car partner, and the man who married Farber's girl. Chapman lived too far downtown to have jogged this far. How did he get here? Where is his gun? Who did this, and why? And who will inform his wife, Mary Alice, a rich man's daughter whom Farber perhaps still loves and who now becomes part of the investigation? Equally important, perhaps more important: who gets to succeed to the top job? By law the mayor must appoint a new PC within ten days. Standing with First Deputy Commissioner Priestly and Chief of the Department Sternhagen, Farber thinks: The new PC will be one of us three. If he can break the case quickly, he has a good chance. But he knows the others will block him any way they can.

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WALL OF BRASS

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Which murder would New York City chief of detectives Bert P. Farber least like to be investigating? The police commissioner's, of course. Especially when the commissioner was the old partner who ... Read full review

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User Review  - dspoon - LibraryThing

Two cops come upon a man lying facedown on a New York street corner. It is before dawn and snowing. The body is wearing a jogging suit, sneakers, a stocking cap. Rushed to the scene in a squad car ... Read full review

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About the author (1995)

New York Times bestselling author Robert Daley is a native New Yorker who has written more than twenty books. His numerous experiences have found there way into his writing. He served in the Air Force, worked as publicity director for the New York Giants football team, spent six years as a European sports correspondent for The New York Times, and became the NYPD deputy police commissioner in charge of public affairs from 1971-1972. Since then, he has become a full-time writer. He and his French-born wife keep homes in Connecticut and Nice.

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