Wallace Stegner: Where the Bluebird Sings to the Lemonade Springs

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Random House Value Publishing, 1995 - Biography & Autobiography - 256 pages
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Nominated for a National Book Critics Circle award, "Where the Bluebird Sings to the Lemonade Springs" gathers together Wallace Stegner s most important and memorable writings on the American West: its landscapes, diverse history, and shifting identity; its beauty, fragility, and power. With subjects ranging from the writer s own migrant childhood to the need to protect what remains of the great western wilderness (which Stegner dubs the geography of hope ) to poignant profiles of western writers such as John Steinbeck and Norman Maclean, this collection is a riveting testament to the power of place. At the same time it communicates vividly the sensibility and range of this most gifted of American writers, historians, and environmentalists."

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Contents

A MIGRANT CHILDHOOD
5
LETTER MUCH TOO LATE
22
CROSSING INTO EDEN
34
THOUGHTS IN A DRY LAND
47
LIVING DRY
57
STRIKING THE ROCK
76
VARIATIONS ON A THEME BY CRÈVECOEUR
99
A CAPSULE HISTORY OF CONSERVATION
117
THE END OF THE BEGINNING
137
ON STEINBECKS STORY FLIGHT
145
GEORGE R STEWART AND THE AMERICAN LAND
155
WALTER CLARKS FRONTIER
172
NORMAN MACLEAN
190
THE SENSE OF PLACE
199
A LETTER TO WENDELL BERRY
207
Copyright

About the author (1995)

In 1972, Wallace Earle Stegner won a Pulitzer Prize for Angle of Repose (1971), a novel about a wheelchair-bound man's recreation of his New England grandmother's experience in a late nineteenth-century frontier town. Stegner was born on February 18, 1909 in Lake Mills, Iowa. He was an American novelist, short story writer, environmentalist, and historian; he has been called "The Dean of Western Writers". He also won the US National Book Award in 1977 for The Spectator Bird. Stegner grew up in Great Falls, Montana; Salt Lake City, Utah; and in the village of Eastend, Saskatchewan, which he wrote about in his autobiography Wolf Willow. Stegner taught at the University of Wisconsin and Harvard University. Eventually he settled at Stanford University, where he initiated the creative writing program. His students included Wendell Berry, and Sandra Day O'Connor. The Stegner Fellowship program at Stanford University is a two-year creative writing fellowship. The house Stegner lived in from age 7 to 12 in Eastend, Saskatchewan, Canada, was restored by the Eastend Arts Council in 1990 and established as a Residence for Artists; the Wallace Stegner Grant For The Arts offers a grant of $500 and free residency at the house for the month of October for published Canadian writers. Stegner died in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on April 13, 1993, from a car accident on March 28, 1993.

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