Walpole

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Macmillan, 1889 - Prime ministers - 251 pages
 

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Interesting view: an 18th century Whig as seen by a 19th century Liberal Read full review

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Page 103 - Seen him I have, but in his happier hour Of social pleasure, ill exchanged for power ; Seen him, uneumber'd with the venal tribe, Smile without art, and win without a bribe.
Page 14 - God bless your majesty and the church. We hope your majesty is for Dr. Sacheverel.
Page 226 - A patriot, sir! Why, patriots spring up like mushrooms! I could raise fifty of them within the four-andtwenty hours. I have raised many of them in one night. It is but refusing to gratify an unreasonable or an insolent demand, and up starts a patriot.
Page 160 - Besides this consideration, he stated, not less pointedly and decidedly, his sentiments with regard to the absolute necessity there is in the conduct of the •affairs of this country, that there should be an avowed and real Minister, possessing the chief weight in the council, and the principal place in the confidence of the King.
Page 56 - Such a controversy was bellum, plusquam civile, as Lucan expresses it. Why could not faction find other advocates ? But among the uncertainties of the human state, we are doomed to number the instability of friendship.
Page 172 - Robert had heard them all he assured them that he was conscious of having meant well ; that in the present inflamed temper of the people the act could not be carried into execution without an armed force...
Page 27 - ... where not necessary, but from an inward satisfaction he took in applauding his own cunning. If any man was ever born under a necessity of being a knave, he was.
Page 251 - DEAN OF ST. PAUL'S. THACKERAY. By ANTHONY TROLLOPE. BURKE. By JOHN MORLEY. MILTON. By MARK PATTISON. HAWTHORNE. By HENRY JAMES, Junr.
Page 146 - ... lord chamberlain ; the master of the horse, and the groom of the stole. Lord North, who from his anxiety to supply the void occasioned by Fox's absence took part in every discussion, immediately intimated his intention of moving to insert the names of the princes of the...
Page 168 - Second, the prevention of these frauds and the decrease of smuggling would be a gain to the honest trader. Third, accompanied as it was by a simplification of rates, this cheaper and easier collection would be such an advantage to the revenue as to enable the Chancellor of the Exchequer to please the country gentlemen by taking a shilling off the land tax. Fourth, and much the most important of all, it would tend to make London a free port, and by consequence the market of the world.

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