Wandering Heath: Stories, Studies, and Sketches

Front Cover
C. Scribner's sons, 1895 - 276 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 17 - I do believe there's a leg moving ! " and running fore, he stooped over the small drummer-boy that I told you about. The poor little chap was lying there, with his face a mass of bruises, and his eyes closed — but he had shifted one leg an inch or two, and was still breathing. So my father pulled out a knife, and cut him free from his drum — that was lashed on to him with a double turn of Manilla rope — and took him up and carried him along here, to this very room that we're sitting in.
Page 24 - Look at this,' he says to my father, showing him the lock ; ' I picked it up off a starving brass-worker in Lisbon, and it is not one of your common locks that one word of six letters will open at any time. There's janius in this lock ; for you've only to make the...
Page 18 - Book; but somehow his head had been hurt in coming ashore, and he talked foolish-like, and 'twas easy seen he would never be a proper man again. The others were taken up to Plymouth, and so went their ways; but the trumpeter stayed on in Coverack; and King George, finding he was fit for nothing, sent him down a trifle of a pension after a while — enough to keep him in board and lodging, with a bit of tobacco over. "Now the first time that this man — William Tallifer, he called himself — met...
Page 23 - Despatch had struck and sunk ; and on still days 'twas pretty to hear them out there off the Manacles, the drummer playing his tattoo — for they always took their music with them — and the trumpeter practising calls, and making his trumpet speak like an angel. But if the weather turned roughish...
Page 27 - Toward the last he mostly spent his nights (and his days, too) dozing in the elbow-chair where you sit at this minute. He was dozing then (my father said) with his chin dropped forward on his chest, when a knock sounded upon the door, and the door opened, and in walked an upright young man in scarlet regimentals. "He had grown a brave bit, and his face the color of wood-ashes; but it was the drummer, John Christian. Only his uniform was different from the one he used to wear, and the figures '38'...
Page 19 - His own suit had shrunk a brave bit with the salt water; but into ordinary frock an' corduroys he declared he would not get — not if he had to go naked the rest of his life; so my father, being a good-natured man and handy with the needle, turned to and repaired damages with a piece or two of scarlet cloth cut from the jacket of one of the drowned Marines. Well, the poor little chap chanced to be standing, in this rig-out, down by the gate of Gunner's Meadow, where they had buried two score and...
Page 24 - There's janius in this lock; for you've only to make the rings spell any six-letter word you please, and snap down the lock upon that, and never a soul can open it — not the maker, even — until somebody comes along that knows the word you snapped it on. Now Johnny here's goin', and he leaves his drum behind him; for, though he can make pretty music on...
Page 6 - Terrain — the motto of the Marines. Its parchment, though coloured and scented with woodsmoke, was limp and mildewed; and I began to tighten up the straps — under which the drumsticks had been loosely thrust — with the idle purpose of trying if some music might be got out of the old drum yet.
Page 19 - Now the first time that this man — William Tallifer he called himself — met with the drummer-boy was about a fortnight after the little chap had bettered enough to 'be allowed a short walk out of doors, which he took, if you please, in full regimentals. There never was a soldier so proud of his dress. His own suit had shrunk a brave bit with the salt water; but into ordinary frock an...
Page 105 - ... against the setting sun, descry the spires of El Dorado. Little do ye know your own blessedness; for to travel hopefully is a better thing than to arrive, and the true success is to labour.

Bibliographic information