War and Peace

Front Cover
Penguin, Jun 1, 2007 - Fiction - 1455 pages
9 Reviews
At a glittering society party in St Petersburg in 1805, conversations are dominated by the prospect of war. Terror swiftly engulfs the country as Napoleon's army marches on Russia, and the lives of three young people are changed forever. The stories of quixotic Pierre, cynical Andrey and impetuous Natasha interweave with a huge cast, from aristocrats and peasants, to soldiers and Napoleon himself.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - GaryPatella - LibraryThing

A 1,400 page book that never lost my interest. The characters, each with their own stories, really had an impact on me. This translation was also excellent. Little footnotes are at the bottom ... Read full review

Great translation!

User Review  - browneryan - Borders

I'm not a translation expert on this book but I've compared this translation to others and this one seems best. It holds just the right amount of tradition for things like keeping the names the way ... Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
7
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
18
A NOTE ON THE TEXT
20
WAR AND PEACE
23
CHIEF FAMILIES IN WAR AND PEACE
25
BOOK I
27
BOOK II
361
BOOK III
727
BOOK IV
1115
EPILOGUE
1349
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Count Leo Tolstoy was born on September 9, 1828, in Yasnaya Polyana, Russia. Orphaned at nine, he was brought up by an elderly aunt and educated by French tutors until he matriculated at Kazan University in 1844. In 1847, he gave up his studies and, after several aimless years, volunteered for military duty in the army, serving as a junior officer in the Crimean War before retiring in 1857. In 1862, Tolstoy married Sophie Behrs, a marriage that was to become, for him, bitterly unhappy. His diary, started in 1847, was used for self-study and self-criticism; it served as the source from which he drew much of the material that appeared not only in his great novels War and Peace (1869) and Anna Karenina (1877), but also in his shorter works. Seeking religious justification for his life, Tolstoy evolved a new Christianity based upon his own interpretation of the Gospels. Yasnaya Polyana became a mecca for his many converts At the age of eighty-two, while away from home, the writer suffered a break down in his health in Astapovo, Riazan, and he died there on November 20, 1910.

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