War and the Weather: Or, The Artificial Production of Rain

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S. C. Griggs, 1871 - Rain-making - 171 pages
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Page 24 - ... their forces — a fitting accompaniment of the tempest of human desolation and passion which was raging. A cold, drizzling rain commenced about nightfall, and soon came harder and faster, then turned to pitiless, blinding hail. This storm raged with violence for three hours. I passed long wagon trains filled with wounded and dying soldiers, without even a blanket to shelter them from the driving sleet and hail, which fell in stones as large as partridge eggs, until it lay on the ground two inches...
Page 7 - Rain is generally produced by the rapid union of two or more volumes of humid air, differing considerably in temperature ; the several portions, when mingled, being incapable of absorbing the sauie amount of moisture that each would retain if they had not united.
Page 24 - ... the tempest of human desolation and passion which was raging. A cold, drizzling rain commenced about nightfall, and soon came harder and faster, then turned to pitiless blinding hail. This storm raged with unrelenting violence for three hours. I passed long wagon trains filled with wounded and dying soldiers, without even a blanket to shield them from the driving sleet and hail, which fell in stones as large as partridge eggs, until it lay on the ground two inches deep. Some three hundred men...
Page 66 - ... already to change its face, the allies drawing off from the points they had attacked so fiercely, where they found them secured by these unexpected defenders. They remained, however, in front of each other, the sentinels on each side being in close vicinity, until next morning. On the 27th of August, the battle was renewed under torrents of rain, and amid a tempest of wind. Napoleon, manoeuvring with excellence altogether his own, caused his troops, now increased by concentration to nearly 200,000...
Page 20 - Pittsburg, with three mortar boats, opened, and continued for more than an hour, a fire on the rebels' heavy floating battery at Island No. 10, when the latter, having received several shells from the rifles and mortars, cut loose from her moorings and drifted down the river two or three miles.
Page 90 - Three causes (at least)* appear to affect a barometer : — 1. The direction of the wind — the north-east wind tending to raise it most — the south-west to lower it the most, and wind from points of the compass between them proportionally as they are nearer one or the other extreme point. NE and . AY. may therefore be called the wind's extreme bearings (rather than poles). The range or difference of height shown, due to change of direction only...
Page 68 - ... the question before us. I shall here repeat two facts which occur to my own memory, in the hope that they will lead to analogous statements. The 25th of August 1806, being the day selected for the attack of the islet and fortress of Dannholm, near Stralsund, General Fririon, that he might harass and fatigue the Swedish garrison, ordered it to be cannonaded during the whole day. In spite of these powerful and continued discharges of artillery, a violent thunder-storm visited the spot at nine o'clock...
Page 14 - ... reducing her draught to twentyone feet ten inches. During the night of the 21st instant a position had been selected, and a buoy placed in four fathoms water; and on the following morning at 10 o'clock, at the firing of the first gun from the fort (the signal agreed upon), the Niagara stood in, followed by the Richmond, and both ships came to anchor with springs on their cables, the Niagara in four fathoms and the Richmond in twenty feet water, Fort McRea bearing from the.
Page 14 - SIR : I have the honor to inform you that, on the 22d instant, a combined attack was made upon the rebels at this place, by Colonel Brown, of Fort Pickens, and the United States ships Niagara and Richmond, under my command. By previous arrangement the ships...
Page 55 - Twenty minutes after the first shot was fired, fully 10,000 of our men were stretched writhing on the sod, or still and calm in death; while the enemy's loss was probably little more than 1,000.

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