War Poems, 1898

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Murdock Press, 1898 - Spanish-American War, 1898 - 147 pages
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Page 49 - FOREVER She's up there — Old Glory — where lightnings are sped; She dazzles the nations with ripples of red; And she'll wave for us living, or droop o'er us dead — The flag of our country forever!
Page 96 - To be staunch and valiant and free and strong! " The Lion whelp sprang from the eerie nest, From the lofty crag where the Queen birds rest ; He fought the King on the spreading plain, And drove him back o'er the foaming main. He held the land as a thrifty chief, And reared his cattle and reaped his sheaf. Nor sought the help of a foreign hand, Yet welcomed all to his own free land ! Two were the sons that the country bore To the Northern lakes and the Southern shore, And Chivalry dwelt with the Southern...
Page 96 - RICHARD MANSFIELD, THE Lioness whelped and the sturdy cub Was seized by an eagle and carried up And homed for a while in an eagle's nest, And slept for a while on an eagle's breast, And the eagle taught it the eagle's song: " To be staunch and valiant and free and strong! " The Lion whelp sprang from the eerie nest, From the lofty crag where the Queen birds rest ; He fought the King on the spreading plain, And drove him back o'er the foaming main. He held the land as a thrifty chief, And reared his...
Page 105 - Light-fingered in the melon-patch, and chicken-yard, and such; Much mixed in point of morals and absurd in point of dress, The butt of droll cartoonists and the target of the press; But we've got to reconstruct our views on color, more or less, Now we know about the Tenth at La Quasina...
Page 56 - Did you fail to call me, brothers, 'twere a fault without atone. 'Twas but just to me, my brothers, you should not strike alone. The brethren in the slaughter were no more thine than mine, And the blows that visit vengeance must be mine as well as thine. Through days of placid beauty and nights when tempests toss, I follow down the billow my guide, the Southern Cross; Past lands of quiet splendor, where pleasant waters lave; Past lands whose mountain ramparts fling back the crashing wave. But I see...
Page 75 - Old Glory" waves in the breeze from the heights of San Juan! And so, while the dead are laureled, the brave of the elder years, A song, we say, for the men of to-day, who have proved themselves their peers. Clinton Scollard...
Page 75 - ... garish eye of the sun, And down with its crown of guns a-frown looks the hilltop to be won; There is the trench where the Spaniard lurks, his hold and his hiding-place, And he who would cross the space between must meet death face to face. The black mouths belch and thunder, and the shrapnel shrills and flies; Where are the fain and the fearless, the lads with the dauntless eyes? Will the moment find them wanting? Nay, but with valor stirred ! Like the leashed hound on the coursing-ground, they...
Page 58 - She roars good-bye at the Golden Gate. On ! On ! Alone without gong or bell, But a burning fire, like the fire of hell, Till the lookout starts as his glasses show The white cathedral of Callao. A moment's halt 'neath the slender spire ; Food, food for the men, and food for the fire. Then out in the sea to rest no more Till her keel is grounded on Chile's shore.
Page 59 - Hessian specters shall flit in air As Washington crosses the Delaware ; When the eyes of babes shall be closed in dread As the story of Paul Revere is read; When your boys shall ask what the guns are for, Then tell them the tale of the Spanish war, And the breathless millions that looked upon The matchless race of the Oregon.
Page 56 - ... fling back the crashing wave. But I see no land of splendor, and I see no land of wrath ; I see before me only the ocean's heaving path, And I plunge along that pathway like a giant to the fray, Who hath no stomach in him for aught that might delay. I am nearing you, my brothers, for the western sea's afar, And the ray that lights my course now is the gleaming Northern Star. I pray you wait, my brothers, for the air with war is rife. And in courtesy of knighthood I claim to share the strife....

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