Warman's Physical Training, Or The Care of the Body

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A.G.] Spalding [& bros.], 1889 - Physical education and training - 190 pages
 

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Page 39 - If thou wilt not observe to do all the words of this law that are written in this book, that thou mayest fear this glorious and fearful name, THE LORD THY GOD; 59 Then the LORD will make thy plagues wonderful, and the plagues of thy seed, even great plagues, and of long continuance, and sore sicknesses, and of long continuance.
Page 37 - No cholera infantum, scarlatina, measles, small-pox — not even a toothache ! So extraordinary a thing was it for a son to die before his father that an instance of it is deemed worthy of special notice ; and this first case of the reversal of nature's law was two thousand years after the creation of Adam. See how this reversal of nature's law has, for us, become the law ; for how rare is it now for all the children of...
Page 17 - And we'll not fail. When Duncan is asleep — Whereto the rather shall his day's hard journey Soundly invite him — his two chamberlains Will I with wine and wassail so convince, That memory, the warder of the brain, 65 Shall be a fume...
Page 62 - The Lord giveth, and the Lord ' taketh away ; blessed be the name of the Lord.
Page 36 - I hold it to be morally impossible for God to have created, in the beginning, such men and women as we find the human race, in their physical condition, now to be. Examine the book of Genesis, which contains the earliest annals of the human family. As is commonly supposed, it comprises the first twenty-three hundred and sixty-nine years of human history. With childlike simplicity, this book describes the infancy of mankind. Unlike modern histories, it details the minutest circumstances of social...
Page 16 - ... cannot profitably spend more than six hours out of the twenty-four. The most successful and voluminous literary men of our time, who maintain their vigor to a good age, do not spend more than four or five hours at their desk, having found that that was the limit of their endurance and pleasurable labor.
Page 64 - These peculiarities are neither healthful nor beautiful, and only an ignorant mind or a perverted taste would ever regard them as such. On the score of health, the distorted feet of the Chinese or the deformed skulls of the Flathead Indians are less objectionable than the cramped waists of our devotees of fashion. As regards beauty, it is hard telling which infringes most upon a true ideal.
Page 36 - ... earliest annals of the human family. As is commonly supposed, it comprises the first twenty-three hundred and sixty-nine years of human history. With childlike simplicity, this book describes the infancy of mankind. Unlike modern histories, it details the minutest circumstances of social and individual life. Indeed, it is rather a series of biographies than a history. The false delicacy of modern times did not forbid the mention of whatever was done or suffered. And yet over all that expanse...
Page 50 - that that's the fashion at present among my tribe j sure all my brother puppies smoke now, and a man might as well be out of the world as 'out of the fashion, you know.
Page 37 - ... part of the duration of the human race, not a single instance is recorded of a child born blind or deaf or dumb or idiotic or mal-formed in any way; during the whole period not a single case of natural death in infancy or childhood or early manhood or even in middle manhood is to be found. Not one man or woman died of disease. The simple record is " and he died ; " or " and he died in a good old age and full of years ; " or

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