Warrior Women and Popular Balladry, 1650-1850

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University of Chicago Press, Jan 15, 1996 - Literary Criticism - 233 pages
Masquerading as a man, seeking adventure, going to war or to sea for love and glory, the transvestite heroine flourished in all kinds of literature, especially ballads, from the Renaissance to the Victorian age. Warrior Women and Popular Balladry, 1650-1850 identifies this heroine and her significance as a figure in folklore, and as a representative of popular culture, prompting important reevaluations of gender and sexuality. Dugaw has uncovered a fascination with women cross-dressers in the popular literature of early modern Europe and America. Surveying a wide range of Anglo-American texts from popular ballads and chapbook life histories to the comedies and tragedies of aristocratic literature, she demonstrates the extent to which gender and sexuality are enacted as constructs of history.
 

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Contents

IV
1
V
13
VI
15
VII
43
VIII
65
IX
91
X
119
XI
121
XII
143
XIII
163
XIV
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XV
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XVI
216
XVII
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XVIII
225
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