Wasps Honey: Or, Poetic Gold and Gems of Poetic Thought

Front Cover
J.M. Darton and Company, 1868 - English poetry - 256 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 119 - When he was weak and we were strong, The white man's soul was warmth and light ; With friendly smiles and gentle tongue, He talked of reason and of right. " He asked of us, in language meek, Where flocks and herds might well abide ; We led to river and to creek, Fair streams, and pastures green and wide. "He heard the river-bird content...
Page 127 - I wander in my sorrow's night, My star is emptied of its light ; Thou, flower of joy, art changed to grief, Thy dews, my tears, are on thy leaf. " Therefore do I behold in vain Thy beauty, look on it with pain ; I see thee with an inward groan, Because I look on thee, alone. " All things my sorrow seem to share, There broods a sadness on the air ; There hangs a gloom along the sky, My boy is dead, and thou shouldst die. " Now for the joy which long I had. The sight of thee must make me sad : So in...
Page 164 - I have seen the wild flowers springing In wood, and field, and glen, Where a thousand birds were singing, And my thoughts were of thee then ; For there's nothing gladsome round me...
Page 235 - Wert thou the earliest comer of the year, Loving our land, and so dost stay the last ? And is the sound of growing streams unheard ! Dost thou not see the woods are fading fast, Whilst the dull leaves with wailful winds are stirred ! Haste, haste to other climes, thou solitary bird ! Thy coming was in lovelier skies — thy wing, Long wearied, rested in delightful bowers ; Thou earnest when the living breath of spring Had filled the world with gladness and with flowers ! Skyward the carolling lark...
Page 118 - On swarthy brow, in jet-black hair: I never gathered them, nor knew Where I a child to manhood grew; — What have I then with them to do? Richard Howitt, 'To the Daisy, on Finding One Unexpectedly in Australia, 30 July 1840...
Page 110 - ISLES. When weary, weary winter Had melted from the air, And April leaf and blossom Had clothed the branches bare, Came round our English dwelling A voice of summer cheer, 'Twas thine, returning swallow ! The welcome and the dear. We heard amid the day-break Thy twitter blithe and sweet...
Page 111 - Far on the billowy ocean A thousand leagues are we, Yet here, sad hovering o'er our bark, What is it that we see ? Dear old familiar swallow ! What gladness dost thou bring ! Here rest upon our flying sail Thy weary wandering wing. What glimpses of our native homes And homesteads dost thou bring ! Here rest upon our flying sail Thy welcome, weary wing.

Bibliographic information