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Review: Waverley

User Review  - Lauren - Goodreads

It was better than his Tales from my Landlord series, but I guess there's still a little too much random Scottish battles in this one for me, though this was much easier to read than some of his others. Read full review

Review: Waverley

User Review  - L'Orpailleuse - Goodreads

I read that one in a rush. Couldn't put it down! Read full review

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Page 358 - And every one that was in distress, and every one that was in debt, and every one that was discontented, gathered themselves unto him; and he became a captain over them: and there were with him about four hundred men.
Page 468 - He thought he saw an unusual blaze of light fall upon the book which he was reading, which he at first imagined might happen by some accident in the candle ; but lifting up his eyes, he apprehended, to his extreme amazement, that there was before him, as it were suspended in the air, a visible representation of the Lord Jesus Christ upon the cross, surrounded on all sides with a glory...
Page 152 - Tis the summons of heroes for conquest or death, When the banners are blazing on mountain and heath : They call to the dirk, the claymore, and the targe, To the march and the muster, the line and the charge.
Page 187 - My heart's in the Highlands, my heart is not here, My heart's in the Highlands a-chasing the deer, A-chasing the wild deer and following the roe — My heart's in the Highlands, wherever I go!
Page 463 - There is no European nation, which, within the course of half a century, or little more, has undergone so complete a change as this kingdom of Scotland.
Page 1 - I must modestly admit I am too diffident of my own merit to place it in unnecessary opposition to preconceived associations ; I have, therefore, like a maiden knight with his white shield, assumed for my hero, WAVERLEY, an uncontaminated name, bearing with its sound little of good or evil, excepting what the reader shall hereafter be pleased to affix to it.
Page 1 - Waverley: a Tale of other Days," must not every novel-reader have anticipated a castle scarce less than that of Udolpho, of which the eastern wing had long been uninhabited, and the keys either lost or consigned to the care of some aged butler or housekeeper, whose trembling steps, about the middle of the second volume, were doomed to guide the hero or heroine to the ruinous precincts ? Would not the owl have shrieked and the cricket cried in my very title page?
Page 158 - Mongst craggy cliffs and thunder-battered hills, Hares, hinds, bucks, roes, are chased by men and dogs, Where two hours' hunting fourscore fat deer kills. Lowland, your sports are low as is your seat ! The highland games and minds are high and great.
Page 468 - Struck with so amazing a phenomenon as this, there remained hardly any life in him ; so that he sunk down in the arm-chair in which he sat, and continued, he knew not...
Page 2 - ... following pages neither a romance of chivalry, nor a tale of modern manners ; that my hero will neither have iron on his shoulders, as of yore, nor on the heels of his boots, as is the present fashion of Bond Street ; and that my damsels will neither be clothed

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