Waverley

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Sanborn, Carter and Bazin, 1855
 

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Page 33 - Springlets in the dawn are steaming, Diamonds on the brake are gleaming ; And foresters have busy been To track the buck in thicket green ; Now we come to chant our lay
Page 33 - ... gainst the oak his antlers frayed ; You shall see him brought to bay, ' Waken, lords and ladies gay.' Louder, louder chant the lay, Waken, lords and ladies gay...
Page 198 - My heart's in the Highlands, my heart is not here ; My heart's in the Highlands a-chasing the deer; Chasing the wild deer, and following the roe, My heart's in the Highlands wherever I go.
Page 124 - And every one that was in distress, and every one that was in debt, and every one that was discontented, gathered themselves unto him; and he became a captain over them: and there were with him about four hundred men.
Page 79 - Hie away, hie away, Over bank and over brae, Where the copsewood is the greenest, Where the fountains glisten sheenest, Where the lady-fern grows strongest, Where the morning dew lies longest, Where the black-cock sweetest sips it. Where the fairy latest trips it ; Hie to haunts right seldom seen, Lovely, lonesome, cool and green, Over bank and over brae, Hie away, hie away. " Do the verses he sings," asked Waverley, " belong to old Scottish poetry, Miss Bradwardine ?" " I believe not,
Page 4 - Waverley, a Tale of other Days," must not every novel reader have anticipated a castle scarce less than that of Udolpho, of which the eastern wing had long been uninhabited, and the keys either lost, or consigned to the care of some aged butler or housekeeper, whose trembling steps, about the middle...
Page 243 - Events of this kind pass in less time than the description of them can be written, or than it can be read. The Colonel was for a few moments supported by his men. and particularly by that worthy person...
Page 207 - I was only ganging to say, my lord," said Evan, in what he meant to be an insinuating manner, " that if your excellent honour, and the honourable court, would let Vich Ian Vohr go free just this once, and let him gae back to France, and no to trouble King George's government again, that ony...
Page 7 - Thus, though 1 sometimes, among other literary avocations, turned my thoughts to the continuation of the romance which I had commenced, yet as I could not find what I had already written, after searching such repositories as were within my reach, and was too indolent to attempt to write it anew from memory, I as often laid aside all thoughts of that nature.
Page 7 - ... who were, like most veterans, easily induced to fight their battles over again for the benefit of a willing listener like myself. It naturally occurred to me that the ancient traditions and high spirit of a people who, living in a...

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