Waverley

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Houghton Mifflin, 1923
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Page 346 - Waken, lords and ladies gay." Waken, lords and ladies gay, To the greenwood haste away. We can show you where he lies, Fleet of foot and tall of size ; We can show the marks he made When 'gainst the oak his antlers frayed ; You shall see him brought to bay,
Page 179 - And every one that was in distress, and every one that was in debt, and every one that was discontented, gathered themselves unto him; and he became a captain over them: and there were with him about four hundred men.
Page 261 - My heart's in the Highlands, my heart is not here, My heart's in the Highlands a-chasing the deer, A-chasing the wild deer and following the roe — My heart's in the Highlands, wherever I go!
Page 52 - ... for plaguing them so long with old-fashioned politics, and Whig and Tory, and Hanoverians and Jacobites. The truth is, I cannot promise them that this story shall be intelligible, not to say probable, without it. My plan requires that I should explain the motives on which its action proceeded ; and these motives necessarily arose from the feelings, prejudices, and parties of the times.
Page 12 - ... and could it have • been possible for me, with a moderate attention to decorum, to introduce any scene more lively than might be produced by the jocularity of a clownish but faithful valet, or the garrulous narrative of the heroine's fille-de-chambre, when rehearsing the stories of blood and horror which she had heard in the servants...
Page 15 - ... those passions common to men in all stages of society, and which have alike agitated the human heart, whether it throbbed under the steel corslet of the fifteenth century, the brocaded coat of the eighteenth, or the blue frock and white dimity waistcoat of the present day.
Page xxxiv - The tale of Waverley was put together with so little care, that I cannot boast of having sketched any distinct plan of the work.

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