Waves Astern: A Memoir of World War II and the Cold War

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Author House, Nov 29, 2004 - Biography & Autobiography - 320 pages

 

An interesting story about an interesting man, told in a most entertaining fashion. A real page turner”

          Dr Bob Allota, coauthor, “The Last Voyage of the SS Henry Bacon”

 

 

In Waves Astern, E. Spurgeon Campbell recalls eight decades of adventures to exotic and sometimes isolated destinations while serving his country.

 

At 20, Campbell was a radio operator in the Merchant Marine during World War II, later surviving enemy attacks and the sinking of the Henry Bacon whose “cargo” was a group of Norwegian refugees. Campbell recalls the February night in a lifeboat in the Arctic filled with terrified refugees, his efforts to send SOS signals in gale-force winds, and of their miraculous rescue.

 

Decades later, he and the survivors were reunited when he was honored by the Norwegian government.

 

Campbell’s odyssey includes “Cold War” episodes in Eniwetok and Thule, Greenland and a 20-year career with Radio Free Europe.

 

 

 

 

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Contents

Its Another Boy
1
Decision Time
6
Gallups Island
10
My First Ship
29
Sea Duty
39
Henry Bacon
64
Marriage
90
Post War Adjustments
103
Changes
115
Eniwetok
120
You Can Go Home Again
137
One Night and One Day in Thule
144
Washington
161
Portugal
176
Darmstadt
211
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

About the Author Growing up on a farm in Alabama, E. Spurgeon Campbell was fascinated listening to voices over his battery radio set, voices beckoning to a wider world. The magical technology of radio became a passage to a lifetime of adventure. Beginning in cramped cabins of Merchant Marine ships during World War II, signaling through bombardments and once from a lifeboat in the Arctic, Campbell learned radio waves can save lives. His career took him from Eniwetok in the Pacific To The top of the world in Thule, Greenland and then to 20 years with Radio Free Europe, sending news to oppressed societies behind the Iron Curtain. He and his wife, Bea, are retired in Cullman, Alabama.

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