Waves of Protest: Social Movements Since the Sixties

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Jo Freeman, Victoria Johnson
Rowman & Littlefield, 1999 - Philosophy - 381 pages
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This book updates and adds to the classic Social Movements of the Sixties and Seventies, showing how social movement theory has grown and changed_from an earlier emphasis on collective behavior, to the resource mobilization approach, and currently to analyses that emphasize culture, ideology, and collective identity. Top social scientists combine insiders' insights with critical analyses to examine a wide variety of social movements active in the most recent U.S. cycle of protest. Waves of Protest is a must-read for students of social movements, social change, political sociology, and American studies.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
On the Origins of Social Movements
7
Mobilizing the Disabled
25
Group Processes Recruitment
47
Building
65
Organization
83
The Consequences of Professionalization and Formalization
99
ACT UP As a Social Movement
135
A Model for Analyzing the Strategic Options of Social
221
Civil Disobedience and Protest Cycles
267
The Transformation of a Constituency into a Social
277
Demise
303
The Decline of the Civil Rights Movement
325
Rise
349
Index
365
About the Contributors
377

Collective Identity and the Development
153

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About the author (1999)

Jo Freeman is editor of Social Movements of the Sixties and Seventies and Women: A Feminist Perspective and author of A Room at a Time and The Politics of Women's Liberation. Victoria Johnson is assistant professor of sociology at Bates College and a contributor to several anthologies on social movements.

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