'We donkeys' in Devon, by 'Volo non valeo'.

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Page 12 - halloa for biscuits,' as they call it. Seventeen shillings and sixpence is allowed by the parish for bell-ringing. Two and sixpence of this is spent in biscuits (ie, farthing cakes). One shilling's worth of these are retained by the ringers; the remaining ones are given to the children, who formerly came into the churchyard and shouted, the biscuits being distributed from the porch. A few years since people awoke to the fact that a churchyard was hardly a suitable place for halloaing, and the biscuits...
Page 46 - Until I find out a place for the temple of the LORD ; an habitation for the mighty GOD of Jacob.
Page 8 - It must have been during these structural alterations that the " curious discovery," alluded to by Miss Gibbons, was made. The following is her account of it : — " In stripping off the ivy [from the south wall], part of the actual outside wall was pulled down. The workmen were unable to enter the room which they believed to be within this wall, but found themselves within a long passage, running the whole length of the room, and the existence of which was till then unknown. How it could ever have...
Page 47 - King and his country in ye office of a Justice of Peace, under three Princes — Q. Elizabeth, King James, and King Charles I. ; and, having served his generation, dyed in the 76 yeare of his age, An.
Page 13 - ... shilling's worth of these are retained by the ringers; the remaining ones are given to the children, who formerly came into the churchyard and shouted, the biscuits being distributed from the porch. A few years since people awoke to the fact that a churchyard was hardly a suitable place for halloaing, and the biscuits were distributed from the church-gate. For the last two years the biscuits have been given away at some distance from the sacred edifice."6 The cakes are small, round, and long,...
Page 12 - Duke. Item Memorandum that I give licence to John Duren, who is Registrar and Clarke of East Budleigh to insert the same. In witness whereof I have put my hand the day and year above written 1656 Ro Duke.
Page 9 - ... the writer is much indebted to Mr. JC Palmer, who remembers the division of the field as shown in the Tithe Map, and saw the exhumed bones. He states that they were carefully examined and pronounced to be human, and that their discovery caused much sensation at the time. Miss Gibbons mentions, that "the origin of the name that now finds most believers is that it was once a rabbit-warren, its owner having the name of Deadman, and that it was really "Deadman's Burrows "(We Donkeys, p.
Page 12 - ... for bell-ringing. Two and sixpence of this is spent in biscuits (ie, farthing cakes). One shilling's worth of these are retained by the ringers; the remaining ones are given to the children, who formerly came into the churchyard and shouted, the biscuits being distributed from the porch. A few years since people awoke to the fact that a churchyard was hardly a suitable place for halloaing, and the biscuits were distributed from the church-gate. For the last two years the biscuits have been given...
Page 47 - Zachary f 1759, of Clovelly Court and Lincoln's Inn, with portrait medallion against obelisk (the inscription says: 'Exemplarily modest, diligently capable, communicative, he acquired a handsome fortune, not only unenvied, but with the Esteem and Love of all who had the Pleasure of knowing him').
Page 7 - Le buried in Littleham Church, nigh my father and mother, or in the chancel there by my sister-in-law, Jane Drake." On his tombstone are the lines : — Preachers and poor may say my death Was ended in a lively faith, The yearly gifts that I them gave, Till Time be ended they must have.

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