Wealth of Nations

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., Nov 1, 2007 - Business & Economics - 596 pages
1 Review
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
Adam Smith revolutionized economic theory with his 1776 work An Inquiry to the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations. He proposed rules governing labor, supply, and demand; and describes division of labor, stockpiling of wealth, lending, and interest. Smith also discusses how economies lead to opulence. Wealth of Nations also offers a defense for free-market capitalism. This edition of Wealth of Nations is an abridged version edited by Harvard economics professor CHARLES JESSE BULLOCK (1869-1941) and published in 1901 by Harvard Classics, a series that offered the essential readings for anyone who wanted the functional equivalent of a liberal arts education. Any student of economics should be familiar with the concepts and laws that Smith developed, as much of economic theory is still based upon his work. Scottish economist and philosopher ADAM SMITH (1723-1790) helped set standards in the fields of political economics and moral philosophy, playing a key role in the early development of the scholarship of economics. His other writings include Essays on Philosophical Subjects.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - thcson - LibraryThing

Books 1-3 don't quite live up to the lofty reputation of this work. The parts dealing with economic theory and philosophy are quite brief and simple and the rest is just a tediously detailed ... Read full review

Contents

Of tmm Causes ow Imhiovsmeot ik the moovcnva Powe
9
Of the Principle Which Gives Occasion to the Division
19
Of the Origin and Use of Money
29
Price fa labour and Their Price in Money
36
Of the Natural and Market Price of Commodities
58
Of the Wages of Labour
68
Of the Profits of Stock
93
and Stock
105
BOOK II
221
Of Money Considered as a Particular Branch of the General
233
BOOK
319
BOOK IV
325
Such Goods as Can Be Produced at Home
348
of Almost All Kinds from Those Countries with which
370
Economy Which Represent the Produce of Land as Either
446
BOOK V
464

Of the Rent of Land
153

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 10 - But if they had all wrought separately and independently, and without any of them having been educated to this peculiar business, they certainly could not each of them have made twenty, perhaps not one pin in a day...
Page 20 - It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker, that we expect our dinner, but from their regard to their own interest. We address ourselves, not to their humanity but to their self-love, and never talk to them of our own necessities but of their advantages.

Bibliographic information