Welsh Lyrics of the Nineteenth Century: First series

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Simpkin, Marshall, 1896 - Welsh poetry - 117 pages
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Page 70 - Mid the rushes whisp'ring, murm'ring — Oh ! that I were like the rill. Mountain ling, whose flow'r and fragrance Sorest longings to me bring, To be ever on the mountains — Oh ! that I were like the ling. Mountain bird, whose joyous singing On the wholesome breeze is heard, Flitting hither, flitting thither — Oh ! that I were like the bird ! Mountain child am I, and lonely Far from home my song I sing ; But my heart is on the mountain With the birds amid the ling.
Page 57 - Irdris' lofty seat, O'er Berwyn and Plynlimon great And hills which round them lower meet, Blow winds of liberty. And like the breezes high and strong, Which through the cloudwrack sweep along Each dweller in this land of song Is free, is free, is free ! Never, O Freedom, let sweet sleep Over that wretch's eyelids creep Who bears with wrong and shame.
Page 79 - Oh welcome, Night, that bid'st the world be still, That through the stars eternity may speak. Too early, Dawn, too early dost thou wake; Too early climbest up the Eastern hill: Too early, stay; so quiet is the Night, And in her pensive breeze such sympathy, She shows us suns that suffer no eclipse, O'er which the grave's dark shadow ne'er can lie. Nay, come not yet, O Dawn : thy laughing lips Thy wanton glance, and frolic songs of glee, The congress of those holier spheres profane, And when night...
Page 57 - ... high and strong, Which through the cloudwrack sweep along Each dweller in this land of song Is free, is free, is free ! Never, O Freedom, let sweet sleep Over that wretch's eyelids creep Who bears with wrong and shame. Make him to feel thy spirit high, And like a hero do or die, And smite the arm of tyranny, And lay its haunts aflame. Rather than peace which makes thee slave, Rise, Europe, rise, and draw thy glaive, Lay foul oppression in its grave, No more the light to see. Then heavenward turn...
Page 57 - SEE, see where royal Snowdon rears Her hoary head above her peers To cry that Wales is free! O hills which guard our liberties, With outstretched arms to where you rise In all your pride, I turn my eyes And echo, ' Wales is free !' O'er giant Idris' lofty seat, O'er Berwyn and Plynlimon great And hills which round them lower meet, Blow winds of liberty. And like the breezes high and strong, Which through the cloudwrack sweep along, Each dweller in this land of song Is free, is free, is free...
Page 89 - And heavenly shades, and solitude more high rare, And all wrapt round with fullest harmony Of streams which fall afar. Thus pleasantly 'Neath Nature their fit foster mother's care, Thy children learn from infant hours to bear And work the will of God. Thy scenery So varied-wild, so strangely sweet and strong, Works on them and to music moulds their mind, Till flows their fancy in poetic rills. The voice of Nature breathes in every song And we may read therein thy features kind As in some tarn that...
Page 83 - Some memory of a yet diviner world And things illumined by the light of God That dowers the stars with beauty...
Page 80 - O peaceful hours, When on its axis sleeps the untiring wheel, And from this loud-voiced world of ours No taint of earth can on the breezes steal. The weary sailor, when time's tempests rage, Joys when he sees, on the far shores of heaven, The fiery line of stars, as beacons given To guide him to the eternal anchorage.
Page 116 - And brave those waters. Yet strait tho' be the vale and dim, And though the skies are dark and drear, And though the mountains everywhere Rise steep and rugged round me here To bar me out from life ! there lives One Star which shineth bright and clear From out the sky and comfort gives To soothe my sadness.

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