Welsh Settlement of Pennsylvania

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W. J. Campbell, 1912 - Pennsylvania - 631 pages
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Contents

I
11
II
33
III
45
IV
61
V
63
VI
93
VII
141
VIII
163
X
195
XI
207
XII
213
XIII
249
XIV
279
XV
305
XVI
327
XVII
419

IX
175
XVIII
497

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Page 184 - Penn and his ungodly crew, so that the Lord may be glorified, and not mocked on the soil of this new country with the heathen worship of these people.
Page 305 - At our arrival we found it a wilderness ; the chief inhabitants were Indians and some Swedes, who received us in a friendly manner ; and though there was a great number of us, the good hand of Providence was seen in a particular manner, in that provisions were found for us by the Swedes and Indians, at very reasonable rates, as well as brought from divers other parts, that were inhabited before.
Page 182 - Antiqu1ty of the Quakers, proved out of the Scriptures of Truth. Published in Love to the Papists, Protestants, Presbyterians, Independents and Anabaptists. With a Salutation of Pure Love to all the Tender-hearted Welshmen. But more especially to Flintshire, Denbighshire, Caernarvonshire and Anglesea. By their Countryman and Friend, Thomas Wynne.
Page 439 - The rule of the road is a paradox quite In riding or driving along; If you keep to the left you are sure to be right ; If you keep to your right you'll be wrong.
Page 18 - OH for a lodge in some vast wilderness, Some boundless contiguity of shade, Where rumour of oppression and deceit, Of unsuccessful or successful war, Might never reach me more.
Page 314 - Among those adventurers and settlers who arrived about this time, were also many from Wales, of those who are called ancient Britons, and mostly Quakers ; divers of whom were of the original or early stock of that society there. They had early purchased of the proprietary in England, 40,000 acres of land.
Page 316 - The inhabitants have many fine plantations of corn, and breed abundance of cattle, inasmuch that they are looked upon to be as thriving and wealthy as any in the province— and this must always be said of the Welsh, that wherever they come, 'tis not their fault if they do not live, and live well, too; for they seldom spare for labor, which Seldom fails of success.
Page 381 - Proprietor hath promised, we Question not but he will perform, and in whatever he has given us power we are Ready to doe, and when you please to Demand willing to Confirm to you the said tract by Pattent as we doe unto other purchasers according to the warr't and Survey, the which if you Refuse, and others accept, You Cannot think it hard if we grant your Refusal to them who have Equal right with you by purchase to take up land. To this we desire you will be speedy and plain in your Answer as we...
Page 310 - Country lots. We had much adoe to get a grant of it, but it Cost us 4 or 5 days attendance, besides some score of miles we traveled before we brought it to pass. I hope it will please thee and the rest yt are concerned, for it hath most rare timber, I have not seen the like in all these parts, there is water enough beside.
Page 309 - At this time my father, Thomas Sion Evan, was living with the Swedes, as I mentioned before, and intending daily to return to Wales ; but as time advanced, the country improved. In the course of three years several were beginning to obtain a pretty good livelihood, and my father determined to remain with them. There was, by this time, no land to be bought within twelve miles...

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